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Emerald Study References (Spoilers)
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Picture of Zzedar
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The title of "Study in Emerald" is a reference to the first Sherlock Holmes adventure, "A Study in Scarlet."

"Vernet" was the name of Sherlock's great-uncle, according to "The Greek Interpreter."

"Sigerson" was the pseudonym Sherlock mentions having used in "The Return of Sherlock Holmes."

The story is told from the point of view of Sebastian Moran, Moriarty's right-hand man, as mentioned in "The Return of Sherlock Holmes."

The theatre company is called "The Strand," which was the name of the magazine in which the original Sherlock Holmes stories were published.

Moriarty was a professor of mathematics, hence the "Dynamics of an Asteroid" thing.

Sherlock smokes a pipe, of course.

The pseudo-advertisement at the beginning of Chapter Two has apparently been posted by Victor von Frankenstein.

The pseudo-advertisement at the beginning of Chapter Three has been posted by Vlad Tepes, more commonly known as Dracula. ("Exsanguinator" means "remover of blood.")

I have no idea who posted the pseudo-advertisement at the beginning of Chapter Four.

Watson did in fact have a limp, and fought in the "Second Afghan War." During the battle of Maiwand he "was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail bullet, which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian artery."

Almost the first thing Sherlock said to Watson was "You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive," just as in "Study...."

Sherlock and Watson originally met in a chemical laboratory, where they mentioned their flaws to discover if they were compatible.

Sherlock always kicked Watson out of the sitting room when visitors were coming, until Watson joined the team.

Lestrade is directly lifted from the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Did I miss anything?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Zzedar,


In the depths of my heart I can't help being convinced that my dear fellow men, with a few exceptions, are worthless.
-- Sigmund Freud
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good annotations!

The intro to chapter 3 refers to Dr Jekyll/Mr Hyde "Release the Inner You!" indeed...

Intro to chap. 4 is Vlad/Dracula (assuming just a typo above when you refer to that as intro to chap. 3)

Intro to chap. 5 seems to refer to Spring Heeled Jack, see:

Spring Heeled Jack

(that was just the first URL I found via google, but seems sound enough on the basics)
 
Posts: 23 | Registered: March 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yeah, I figured theh Jekyll one was too obvious to bother with. Incidentally, there's a rather subtle thing with Moran. In The Return of Sherlock Holmes, it's stated that Colonel Moran was a fine, upstanding hero-type until late in life. You'll notice that in Study in Emerald, he signs off as a retired Major. Presumably the capture and torture he mentions having received in the Study universe caused him to be discharged before going bad, and before he would have attained the rank of Colonel. There is no mention of his having been captured in Return, nor does he have any shoulder injury -- indeed, he is a famous marksman, perhaps the best in the world.


In the depths of my heart I can't help being convinced that my dear fellow men, with a few exceptions, are worthless.
-- Sigmund Freud
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I forgot to mention -- there are a lot of references to A Study in Scarlet in the story, most notably the "Rache" written in blood on the wall. Other references include: the coachman being a member of the Opposition; the way Moriarty referred to the suspects as "Tall Man" and "Limping Doctor" (echoing the way Sherlock used the type of shoes worn by the perpetrators as proper names); and the fact that Moriarty was able to tell that one of them was tall by the height of the message and the fact that the pipe was knocked out against the mantle.


In the depths of my heart I can't help being convinced that my dear fellow men, with a few exceptions, are worthless.
-- Sigmund Freud
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is less-certain stuff, speculation:

The worm that withered Moran's arm is probably a reference to a Bram Stoker story, "The Lair of the White Worm."

The Chap. 4 title "The Skin and the Pit" might be a reference to a Poe story, "The Pit and the Pendulum."
 
Posts: 2627 | Location: Manila | Registered: October 15, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fascinating! Thank you for these! I just read it today, and while I knew a few of them, I knew I was missing others. Very helpful!


**girl in the world**
 
Posts: 138 | Location: Michigan | Registered: July 17, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just realized that I made a mistake in the annotations, in saying that "Dynamics of an Asteroid" was merely an example of Moriarty's mathematics. In fact, it was specifically mentioned as one of his works in The Valley of Fear, of such brilliance that "it is said that there was no man in the scientific press capable of criticizing it." Of course, in "Study in Emerald" Holmes does criticize it, because he's just that good.

Oddly enough, in The Valley of Fear "Dynamics of an Asteroid" was a full book, not merely a paper as in "Study in Emerald."


In the depths of my heart I can't help being convinced that my dear fellow men, with a few exceptions, are worthless.
-- Sigmund Freud
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the info, Zz. "Emerald" fell completely flat for me, and now I know its because I never read Sherlock Holmes.
 
Posts: 83 | Registered: October 03, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recomend reading them... they're quite good.

I read an interesting article recently about a Sherlock Holmes obessive who commited suicide under mysterious circumstances... it mentioned the 'serious' Holmsian scholarship, which pretends Holmes and pals are real, and attempts to explain inconsistancies in the stories.

Like comic fanboys, only more washed, i would assume....

(Batman met Holmes once... logically enough)
 
Posts: 16135 | Location: Sydney, Australia | Registered: June 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by The Lord of Nothings:
I recomend reading them... they're quite good.

I read an interesting article recently about a Sherlock Holmes obessive who commited suicide under mysterious circumstances... it mentioned the 'serious' Holmsian scholarship, which pretends Holmes and pals are real, and attempts to explain inconsistancies in the stories.

Like comic fanboys, only more washed, i would assume....

(Batman met Holmes once... logically enough)
Any particular book or story stand out that I should begin with?
 
Posts: 83 | Registered: October 03, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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