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When and What was YOUR discovery of the Gaiman Genius?
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Picture of RadagastTheBrown
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I was recommended Sandman by a friend and starting looking at Neil's other works after I finished that series and all derivatives. There was a sadness in finishing Sandman, almost like a fine wine that will never taste as good as the first sip. Not that his other works aren't amazing in their own right. I just liked that particular world he created (Bast, Lucien, the Corinthian, etc.).
 
Posts: 10 | Registered: September 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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it's now Smile that I discovered him...

I'm starting to watch the films beginning with BEOWULF...
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: December 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd read Coraline, but that wasn't the hook. It was American Gods. I was only a few dozen pages in, but when Shadow met Mr. Wednesday I went 'ohhh'...

And then I lost three days reading that book.

When I came out the other side I was a believer.
 
Posts: 17 | Location: (Sings) A World Of Pure Imagination | Registered: January 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While I was a comicbook fan, my first book was Neil's Hitchhiker's Guide guide. Then my local comicbook store guy kept recommending Sandman, but I didn't like horror comics, which is what the first issues looked like (I was right). I ignored the many recommendations in the Comics Buyer's Guide until "Sandman Month", buying the Orpheus Special. I then purchased every trade, and spent a lot of money on back issues. The good news? I was prepared when the next collection came out, the deluxe hardcover of Seasons of Mist.

Also learned my lesson, snagging a first printing of Bone #1. (I'm also a big fan of Walt Kelly.)

Anyone become a fan because of Duran Duran?
 
Posts: 5 | Location: The City of Dreams | Registered: March 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For me it started in 2002. The library I work at wanted to start a graphic novel collection. My boss bought the Sandman books. They looked interesting, but before I could read them someone checked them out and never returned them. I happened to be in college and was writing a paper one why graphic novels belong in a library and I came across Neil’s name a lot. So I convinced my boss to reorder them. Once I read them I was hooked. Since then I have had the pleasure of introducing Neil’s writings to others.


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Life is too short to read a bad book.
 
Posts: 2485 | Location: Page 42 | Registered: December 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Mister Neil came to one of my previous libraries in early 2002 and we had him autograph one of our circulating Sandman copies. He signed it, "Please don't steal this book. Neil Gaiman." I don't know if it's still there or not Razz.


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"I know that people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones blah blah blah.... but THAT guy is paranoid!" -- Agent Fox Mulder
 
Posts: 37699 | Location: Jacksonville, FL | Registered: December 13, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm a storyteller in my role-play group and one of my favourite games used Neverwhere as an inspiration. One of my players was reading Neverwhere last year and was telling me how I would LOVE it. so he let me borrow it, now It takes me a while to finish books, but I finished Neverwhere in a day and I was hooked ever since!
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Behind the keyboard | Registered: April 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had to do an extract of Coraline for a drama performance when I was 13, and read it then. Wasn't very taken with it at the time, and didn't think about Gaiman again until I was 17 or 18, when I bought Fragile Things on a whim. I was completely hooked and loved it, and went on to read Anansi Boys, Smoke and Mirrors, Neverwhere, Good Omens, American Gods, and have just started on the Sandman series :-).
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I got turned on to the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett and was hooked. I picked up all things Pratchett which included Good Omens. I liked it and thought I better read more of Gaiman. Picked up Anansi Boys and was hooked. I have many more to read, but I have been loaning out my books to my students and hopefully turning them on to him also. One of my students fell in love with Coraline and now is reading Stardust for one of her summer reads.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: June 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I picked up a copy of 'Don't Panic' while on holiday in Wales 20 years ago, and 'Good Omens' a year later. I was reading them as a Douglas Adams/Terry Pratchett fan, and while I registered who Neil Gaiman was it wasn't until later in 1990 that I stumbled upon him as a solo writer.

I was getting interested in the idea of reading comics again. I recognised Neil Gaiman's name on a copy of 'The Doll's House' while browsing the graphic novels section in W.H. Smiths. Mainly I remembered the early 1940s/gas mask version of The Sandman from a comic I'd read as a kid, and thought this was going to be about the same character. I flipped through it, a bit baffled, didn't buy it then... but it stuck in my mind and a couple of months later I acquired a copy. I haven't looked back.
 
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I came across Neil's entangling style while aimlessly browsing the net some 2 years ago. I believe it was stumbleupon that took me to one of his short stories - the one about 'Talking to Girls at Parties' - and once it ended, I found myself wanting more. For whoever didn't have the chance to read it yet, click 'ere : http://www.neilgaiman.com/p/Co...t_Parties_%28Text%29 . I then carried on with Neverwhere, American Gods, Anansi Boys and the graphic novel he's written for Marvel - Neil Gaiman's Eternals.

Very cool style, it always made me think "If I were a writer, these are exactly the kind of stories I would have written"
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: July 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I was just getting old enough to really appreciate smarter comic books (8 or 9) I found a copy of Sandman and read the story where Dream meets with different pantheons to decide who gets ownership of Hell. I fell in love with it, but couldn't find any more. I read 'Good Omens' at about 14, making it my favourite book but didn't put the two together. Just about a year and a half ago, I realized that all my favourite things(Marvel's 1602, Good Omens, Mirrormask, Stardust, and that elusive Sandman) were all done by the same person.

Now I've just started watching Neverwhere. (Can't believe I haven't heard of this before, it's fantastic)
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Bumcrack of Canada, MN | Registered: July 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I sort of encountered Gaiman's Violent Cases in 1987. I wasn't old enough to drive, and the only comic store nearby catered almost exclusively to Marvel and DC fans. Once in a while I'd accompany my late father on trips to Kitchener and stock up on indies like Miracleman at the now late Now & Then Comics. I was already a fan of Dave McKean via his covers for Hellblazer, but with everything else I had to catch up on (and my limited funds) I didn't bother purchasing it. It was no longer in stock the next time I went, but I still had no clue who Gaiman was. In 1988 (when I was just beginning to learn to drive but didn't have a car) I picked up Black Orchid because I was a McKean fan, I was always desperate for comics that were more grown up and, since it was DC, my comic store bothered carrying it (I still have the advertising flyer). I enjoyed Black Orchid, but fell in love with Gaiman's work with Sandman #1, and read more of his work in titles like Secret Origins. When I bought that first issue my dealer said something like "I didn't think anyone would bother buying that thing" (he said something similar about the Dark Knight mini-series he almost didn't order in about 2 years earlier). When I found out Gaiman also wrote Violent Cases (probably in a Sandman lettercol) I was filled with regret I had passed it by, but thankfully it came back into print. In these days of ebay, Amazon and practically everything staying in print in collections (or downloadable as torrents), nobody can really understand how devestating it could be for kids stuck in the middle of nowhere to miss a title due to the whims of your comic store. Unfortunately it also takes away a bit from the thrill of successfully hunting things down in flea markets, on road trips, etc.
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: August 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hm... I knew he existed, thanks to Terry Pratchett, and someone on a holiday camp reading Neverwhere (where the Czech translation of Door's name - I read a bit of it when no one was loking - seemed like a touch of genius).

I also knew Sandman existed thanks to a lesson on comics in literary seminar on Grammar school. I got to flip through a copy - unfortunately, I do not know which book it was, only that it was in black and white - and loved the art, and was left with a sense of longing for something I got just a glimpse of, for years to come... I got the same feeling from a fan art of Sandman on Elfwood, which I'm now unable to find there anymore - a picture of Dream standing on roofs at night. As if I only dreamt about it...

And then I, somehow, stumbled over Neil Gaiman's blog and quite liked it. Then, months, maybe even more, later, I stumbled over it again and still quite liked it. And again, and again, until I found myself checking it out regularly (and adding it to my favourite websites). About that time I realised that the new book he kept mentioning, The Graveyard Book, could be my kind of book... I loved the way he talked about death in connection to it. Not that I'd be in any way fascinated by death; it just seemed right. I discovered that he liked Chesterton. And I was sold, before I ever read any of his books. Big Grin

The final straw was probably discovering that my oldest, best friend had discovered and liked him independently of me. Although that has nothing to do with Gaiman himself.


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There is Robinson, alone on a deserted island; but they will marry.
 
Posts: 180 | Location: alternating between Bohemia and Moravia | Registered: September 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was introduced to Neil Gaiman's work after seeing a movie trailer for Stardust. I thought the movie looked really interesting, so I looked it up on wikipedia (my go-to site when I want to find out more on books or movies). I found out that it was based on a book, which I decided to get from Amazon, as I had a 25 dollar gift card. I read it as soon as it arrived, and I loved it. I had no idea who Neil Gaiman was, but I knew that he was one of my favorite authors. I was finally able to get a hold of Coraline in a library and decided to read it, knowing that Gaiman was a promising author. American Gods came next, and even though I was somewhat underwhelmed, I knew that Neil Gaiman was good, thanks mostly to his short stories posted on his website. And Good Omens was every bit as good as promised, and reminded me a lot of HHGTTG. I finally started Sandman when I found it at a bookstore after getting home from basic and proceeded to spend copious amounts of money in attaining the series. I've just finished Fables and Reflections this morning, and as soon as I feel like it's been long enough (probably a couple of days) I'll buy the next one. I think I want my future husband to be as much like Neil Gaiman as possible.


What if our dreams are reality and reality just dreams?
 
Posts: 7 | Location: Here | Registered: September 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My Mum bought me good Omens when I was 15. 12 years later it is still my favourite book. It was the start of a fantastic addiction. Big Grin


Once upon a time is now.
 
Posts: 7 | Location: Nottingham | Registered: September 25, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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4 yrs ago I picked up Neverwhere at my local library and never looked back: -)


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If vegetarians eat vegetables what do humanitarians eat?
 
Posts: 62 | Location: Everywhere all at once | Registered: December 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a friend (who herself could be a Gaiman character: she has a knowledge of European mythology going back thousands of years... and she fences) who had been recommending Gaiman to me for years and I never listened until she literally forced to borrow and read Neverwhere. I read that book... rather skeptically I'll admit, and liked it... and then I picked up American Gods and Good Omens and I read through them both in a few weeks... and I found them to be brilliant.

Now I'm on Anansi Boys and I'm liking it a lot so far...


"There is more in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than dreamt of in your philosophy." - Hamlet, William Shakespeare
 
Posts: 7 | Location: Chanhassen, MN | Registered: March 07, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I started with Stardust after seeing the movie I bought the book. Then I discovered Neil wrote a book with my favourite author Terry Pratchett, Good Omens. After that I was hooked Smile My favourite novel is American Gods Cool


HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE
 
Posts: 19 | Location: Groningen, The Netherlands | Registered: March 21, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ummm, lets see. About a week or so ago? I picked up a copy of NeverWhere, and just finished it yesterday. Shot right into my top ten favorite books of all time. That VERY rarely happens. I'm reading Stardust right now, and am enjoying that one as well.
 
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