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When and What was YOUR discovery of the Gaiman Genius?
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huumm 2 years ago when I read "Good Omens". I was looking for something new and when I was at the bookstore, the bookseller recommended it. And of course, I'd love it and started to read the rest of Neil's books.


ssdd
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Israel | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some guy (who turned out to sleep with other men's wives) borrowed me a Neverwhere copy. I was... fairly impressed.


********************
Speed leaving without warning
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: June 23, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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DC Comics made a simple color flyer handout around about the 9th issue of Sandman. Just a little info thing stuck into my comic bag that said, "Hey try this out." I loved it, and got all the previous issues (except 2 and 7, boo hoo). That got me started. My Comic Book Guy couldn't figure out why everyone was buying Sandman: no superheroes, no hot chicks. He was a dope.


Shocho
Sunny in Denver
 
Posts: 2 | Location: United States | Registered: August 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Heh.

I found an old, unillustrated copy of Stardust in the unspeakable regions of my towns old library. To get there is almost as bed as leaving, because both are fairly difficult. This library only has the oldest, moldiest, mustiest books you've ever seen, and somehow manage to make even recent copies look like old scifis from the eighties.

Anyways, I liked the title, if not the dustcover, and stuck it in among the rest of the stack that I planned to take home. Some time later and about three books after I originally intended, I read it, and fell in love with it. Unfortunatly, the library didn't have any of his other works, so I gave it up as a one time occurence and went back to absorbing as much authorlie imput as humanly possible.

I didn't really get into his work until I moved to Vancouver, Washington. They had a wonderful selection of comic and hevily illustrated books, and there among all the Inu-Yashas and Usagi no Yojimbo was the illustrated version of STardust, as well as some Sandman comics.

Read 'em. Loved 'em. Made certain that when I spotted anything by him I would pick it up.

Thats how all addictions begin, isnt it?
 
Posts: 67 | Location: Lower Tadfeild | Registered: July 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was given Stardust to read by my boyfriend. It was very so-so, I had enjoyed it a bit but didn't think that I would read anymore. Very bored one day I decided to pick up Neverwhere from his collection of books on the shelf and I was hooked. He has gone on to become my favorite author.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: July 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Eye of the Tigger
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I met Neil's writing in 1999.
One fine day, feeling quite depressed because I'd had to cope with a lot of things for the last few months, I ended up in a bookshop, desperately looking for something to cheer me up. And on the "new books" table in the sci-fi section, I saw this :



I had never heard of Terry Pratchett, never heard of Neil, but I thought the cover was funny, so I took it. And I read it. And it helped. A lot.
That was my first encounter with the Gaiman genius.

Then, of course, I read everything I could find with Neil's name on the cover, Neverwhere, Stardust, Smoke and Mirrors, then American Gods, Coraline... And I got used to reading in English, because I couldn't wait for the translation to be released. But I didn't read the Sandman. I don't know why, I just wasn't in comics at the time.

A few years later (two years from now, if I remember well), I was getting bored at work and I started wandering on the web, and ended up on the local bookshop's website (the same one where I found Good Omens, didn't even know they had a website...).
That was the day before Neil came in Lille and met readers in that same bookshop. So I went to my boss, threatened to immolate myself if I couldn't get the next day off, and the next morning, I met Neil. And then I queued to get my books signed, with a lot of Gaiman fans, most of them holding comics and quite willing to explain everything they knew about the Sandman (and they knew quite a lot).

So, I read the Sandman.

And I loved it.

And then I ran out of books and started reading Neil's Journal. Loved it.

Then I came to the boards. Loved it.

Now, I got so much to read I can hardly find time to work. But my English's improving. So in conclusion, let's say that Neil Gaiman's good for English learning. At least. Smile


*bounces out of thread*
 
Posts: 969 | Location: frog eaters' land | Registered: June 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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hmm, through Terry Prachet, well actually from a sf magazine where I read a story of Prachetts. Then of course I saw this book called The Good Omes which was a part of a bigger book of sf/f stories. Hey, that guy written Sandman and Sandman is supposed to be a really cool comic (so I read in in my DC comics history book)...first Neil I bought was American gods - wow that blown my mind away so now I've bought Neverwhere, which sadly ended in three days and now I'm going to buy Sandman series, cause I'm a collector freak Smile


porcelain and heroin, mixed with lullabys, all that for dying tomorrow people
 
Posts: 38 | Registered: August 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only sounds like Keith Flint
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I dont know if i posted in this or not. I might as well now.

A friend of mine named reeko, was telling me about this book. I told him, Man, I dont read. He says "trust me, this is different." We talked about old gods and the idea of them fighting for survival.

I went out and bought American Gods, 2 years ago, maybe a little more. I dont remember. After reading it in a weekend, I picked up anything i could get from neils.

Still working on the entire sandman series, and havent read coraline yet.
 
Posts: 2193 | Location: LA... sort of. | Registered: April 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
really is wicked
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Via Mr Prachett I'm affraid!!!

Seams like 'Good Omens' is the standard way!


-----------------------------

St.Barbarella:
Sexy Tart.
Buys Ale, Reads Books, And Really Enjoys Leaving Lovers Aching - JP


yes, University is all about incontinence - Mythos

You are a Tradesman. Long before labor unions, your guilds were powerful enough to make a free-market capitalist run away screaming. Who controls the British Crown? Who keeps the metric system down? You do, you do.
 
Posts: 11561 | Location: ooop norrff | Registered: May 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"borrowed" Good Omens from my brother, and I got hooked on funny fantasy from that(like I branched out to hitchhiker's guide) and then I read neverwhere, and fell in love with it. So then I began to read the other books, and now, I'm a neilgaimanaholic, if that is a word, which I seriously doubt.
 
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really is wicked
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quote:
Originally posted by mistletoe:
and now, I'm a neilgaimanaholic, if that is a word, which I seriously doubt.


No, it definetly is a word.

I'm sure of it!


-----------------------------

St.Barbarella:
Sexy Tart.
Buys Ale, Reads Books, And Really Enjoys Leaving Lovers Aching - JP


yes, University is all about incontinence - Mythos

You are a Tradesman. Long before labor unions, your guilds were powerful enough to make a free-market capitalist run away screaming. Who controls the British Crown? Who keeps the metric system down? You do, you do.
 
Posts: 11561 | Location: ooop norrff | Registered: May 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
From out of the cloven pine
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I had quite a few false starts on the Gaiman front. I saw a bit of Neverwhere when it was on TV but I didn't think much of it, mostly because I didn't have a clue what was going on. I've picked up copies of Good Omens several times but since I had no experience of Pratchett or Gaiman at the time I didn't think I'd enjoy reading it (how wrong I was) Then a couple of years ago a guy in my class at collage brought in a copy of what was either Seasons of Mist or At Death's Door and I read a few pages. I liked the style and the idea of Death being a perky goth girl although I don't think I quite got the concept of The Endless. Then I stumbled on some Sandman crossover fic liked what I read so I got one of the graphic novels from the libary and was bowled over.


The world is not beautiful, therefore it is.
 
Posts: 1072 | Location: Kingdom of Albion | Registered: May 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only sounds like Keith Flint
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quote:
Originally posted by Weaver:
I had quite a few false starts on the Gaiman front. I saw a bit of Neverwhere when it was on TV but I didn't think much of it, mostly because I didn't have a clue what was going on. I've picked up copies of Good Omens several times but since I had no experience of Pratchett or Gaiman at the time I didn't think I'd enjoy reading it (how wrong I was) Then a couple of years ago a guy in my class at collage brought in a copy of what was either Seasons of Mist or At Death's Door and I read a few pages. I liked the style and the idea of Death being a perky goth girl although I don't think I quite got the concept of The Endless. Then I stumbled on some Sandman crossover fic liked what I read so I got one of the graphic novels from the libary and was bowled over.


I had a false start too acctually. I picked up the Death book with tori on the front, I kinda browsed it and put it back.
 
Posts: 2193 | Location: LA... sort of. | Registered: April 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was searching for a comic at random for drawing inspiration, and I was being terribly rushed by my company. I reached at random, threw the "art" on the counter, and dove into my purse for money. My friend behind the counter commented something a long the line as "great choice, babe" I nodded absently while I dug for the change i was missing. I got home set the paper bag containing the still unknown comic on my computer desk and went about the rest of schedual for the day.

I believe it was 3 or 4 days later that I finally snagged some time for my often niglected sketch book. I tossed the bag in the trash can next to my easle and looked at the cover.

Death stared back at my dumb founded face as if I was there to amuse her.

That was the first comic I picked up to read since "The Max". I was so excited by the time my eyes landed the back cover that I dove for the phone calling a good a friend of mine to share the news. He laughed at me, and told me how he had handed me the same comic a few weeks prior while I was on the phone and I had set absent mindedly back on his bed. he scolded "I put it away, because if you wre not willing to give it the attention it deserved, You didn't deserve to read it!"

My sketch book has often been niglected since, I tend to get distracted by the words.... LOL...

and a fabulous new world opened its doors for me.. I've been visiting it as often as I can over the years...


Simply Simplicity
~Zy~
 
Posts: 11 | Registered: September 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I bought American Gods while looking for something new. I thought it was a fresh novel, and was drawn in by the reference to the Bender's in Cherryvale, KS as my parents grew up in the area.

My grandfather actually had the hammers under his bed for years until he could get the local museum up and running. I always thought it a bit odd that he slept over those things.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: September 29, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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With the first issue of The Sandman comic "Just of the Sleep" in '89. It was intuition or something. I knew there was something there and I was hooked. It was right up my alley: a piece that had been missing. When I read Neverwhere I had never in my life been so drawn into a story. When I think back it was almost a sexual/enlightening experience to have had my mind connect with the consciousness of the story like that. Hard to explain.

I'm new to these boards so please excuse me for just jumping in.


~*~*~*~*~

"We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience."
(Pierre Teilhard de Chardin)
 
Posts: 44 | Location: Illinois | Registered: September 07, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I used to work a Saturday job at a small games shop (rpgs and board games) and I used to go and have to wake up the owner most weekends as he'd been out on the lash.

Sitting in his living room waiting for him to get together, I found a pile of Sandmans and started reading them. I thought "wow, this is just like the wierd little stories you get in 2000AD, only there's a whole comics worth instead of 4 pages"

Never looked back.
 
Posts: 2732 | Location: The London | Registered: January 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My good ol' fashioned public library. I remember going to the "New Fiction" section and found a little fuzzy book about unicorns and such. Containing a Y chromosome, I almost brushed passed the book, but (lucky for me) there was nothing else of real interest to check out. I read Stardust (which I found out when I got home was, in fact, not a new release at the time. I love fate sometimes)and that was that. From Neverwhere to Good Omens to...ummm whatever else the library had the time!


-----------------------------
"I'd like to be a wolf. Not all the time. Just sometimes. In the dark. I would run through the forests as a wolf at night," said Richard, mostly to himself. "I'd never hurt anyone. Not that kind of wolf. I'd just run and run forever in the moonlight, through the trees, and never get tired or out of breath, and never have to stop. That's what I want to be when I grow up..."
- Neil Gaiman, One Life, Furnished in Early Moorcock
 
Posts: 7 | Location: Second star to the right...straight on til morning | Registered: October 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My first introduction to any of Neil's work was when read two issues of Secret Orgins that he had done back in the late 80s. I realized his genius when I picked up a copy of Sandman #20 on the newsstand back in 1990. As a 12 year old I was glued to the pages. The true defining Gaiman moment though was when I first read the Murder Mysteries GN, still my favorite of his works. Unfortunetly I wasn't introduced to his novels until much more recently by an amazingly awesome individual....
 
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I suppose my first introduction was when hubby bought me the first couple of Sandman trades. Really took to them. Since then I try to read the comics he's bought out and his books. Have read Neverwhere, Coraline, Wolves In the Walss, The Day I swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish (which is one of my all time favourites), just started Anansi Boys and I'm sure I've read something else.

Neil's writing just captures the imagination.

Doh how could I forget American Gods!!! LOL
 
Posts: 10 | Location: England | Registered: October 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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