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is tired of these monkey-fighting snakes on this Monday to Friday plane
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Picture of general punk, MA
posted
Well, the title says it all. And we're looking for simplicity here, I'm a student: translation - lazy and poor. Vegetarian or non (I have roommates to think of, poor delusional meat eaters Razz)
Please?


High Ranking Official of the Realm of Unproductivity and Procrastination,
Dean of the UUP, First Class member of the order of the Pineapple.
-scruffy ambulating reanimated hypothetical vegetarian leigonairre of the undead. ~ Cav
-Look, I've got a cape and a tendency towards violence. It does not make me a superhero! ~ Domitella
-The key thing to remember about historians is that we are entirely capable of being objective, empirical and batshit crazy. ~ Dr. Marvinmarymac
 
Posts: 29254 | Location: Somewhereshire | Registered: January 05, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Biscuitkeeper
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Ok...Family recipe. My mom's Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe. This is gold (and not very healthy).

1 1/3 c oleo
1 c brown sugar
1 c white sugar
2 eggs
2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
3 1/2 c flour
1 c of chopped walnuts
12 oz bag of chocolate chips

Mix oleo, sugar, eggs and vanilla. Add dry ingredients to sugar mix. Add nuts and chips.

Bake 375F 8-10 minutes.

I will eat half the batch right after they get out of the oven. Warm and chewy. Smile


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Posts: 10767 | Location: Michigan | Registered: April 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cheater's Crustless Shepherd's Pie

2lbs ground beef
1/2 tsp Worchestershire Sauce
dash Montreal Steak Spice
1 Packet Beef Boullion powder (Oxo or Bovril)
1 Can Campbell's Mushroom Soup
1/4 Cup Milk

5 medium sized potatoes - boiled and mashed to taste
2 cups frozen corn (or peas, or carrots)

Directions:

Brown ground beef, adding all ingredients except Soup and Milk

Drain grease off of beef mixture and add mushroom soup and milk, stirring well until mixed.

In casserole dish layer beef mixture, veggies (yes, frozen)and mashed potatoes (in that order)

Bake in 350F oven for 25 minutes.


 
Posts: 40 | Location: Ontario, Canada | Registered: November 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is tired of these monkey-fighting snakes on this Monday to Friday plane
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I'll add mine, since I started this thread and all.

measurements don't exactly exist in precise quantities in my world...er...yeah.

so.
take some garlic, mince it
cut up some broccoli
cut up some cauliflower
stirfry them all together with some olive oil.
when hot but still crunchy, add some alfredo sauce, keep stirring, constantly until everything is good and hot.
at same time:
have your favourite pasta a boiling.
drain and mix all together with broccoli, cauliflower and alfredo sauce.
we also like to mince garlic, boil it with some butter and put on bagette for garlic bread.
(heat on one side for a minute or two, flip, but on garlic/buttery goop and cook until browned.


High Ranking Official of the Realm of Unproductivity and Procrastination,
Dean of the UUP, First Class member of the order of the Pineapple.
-scruffy ambulating reanimated hypothetical vegetarian leigonairre of the undead. ~ Cav
-Look, I've got a cape and a tendency towards violence. It does not make me a superhero! ~ Domitella
-The key thing to remember about historians is that we are entirely capable of being objective, empirical and batshit crazy. ~ Dr. Marvinmarymac
 
Posts: 29254 | Location: Somewhereshire | Registered: January 05, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hiya

Does anyone have a nice recipe for soy soup Ramen? Mmmmmmmm ramen..cna't get enough of that stuff. But it would be heaps cheaper to make it, than to visit the local Japanese restaurant every week.


"Money can't buy you friends, but it does get you a better class of enemy" ~ Spike Milligan
 
Posts: 137 | Location: New Zealand | Registered: March 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is a loose cannon
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This isn't mine originally, but it's a great vegitarian recipe. The spices can get expensive, though. Don't worry, it's much simpler than it looks.

Vegitable Tagine
3 tbs olive oil
1 medium onion, minced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsps ground cumin
1 tsp ground ginger
1.5 tsp paprika
0.5 tsp tumeric
0.25 tsp cinnamon
0.25 cayenne pepper
1.5 cups canned diced or crushed tomatoes
2 cups water
1/8 tsp saffron. (really expensive, and in my oppinion, not neccessary, if you're on a budget.)
1 carrot, thinly sliced
1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
2 cups diced green beans
1/4 cup raisins
.5 teaspoon salt
15 oz chick peas, strained and rinsed
1 zuccini, diced
1 yellow squash, diced
.5 cup mushrooms
1.5 cups couscous

1. Heat the oil with the garlic and onions for about five min, while adding spices slowly.
2. Mix in the water, tomatoes, saffron, carrot, sweet potato, raisins, green beans, and salt. Bring mixture to a boil, then cover. Lower the heat to a simmer, and cook for 20 min, or until potatoes are tender. Mix often.
3. Add the chick peas, mushrooms, zuchini, and yellow squash. Cook for 10 min, or until zuchini is tender. Raise heat if the mixture is too watery.
4. In a separate dish, cook couscous according to the directions on the package.
5. Place the couscous in four different bowls, and cover generously with vegetables. Serve with fresh bread Smile Serves four people.


The Way of the Buffalo A podcast of fiction, stuff, and nonsense.
 
Posts: 3120 | Location: North Tonawanda, NY | Registered: December 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Psittacula servus
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Being from Minnesota, we serve hot dish a lot. Hot dish can include almost anything. It usually has noodles or rice with other ingredients added. This was a favorite last time I served it.

Hot Dish with cabbage and peanut sauce

16 oz. unsalted peanuts
8 oz. Ancient Harvest Quinoa Organic Whole Wheat Spaghetti
15 oz. can of organic garbanzo beans
16 oz. frozen mixed vegetables, Asian blend
about 4 cups cabbage, shredded (I slice it with the food processor.)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 green chilis
2 red chilis
2 cloves garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
3/4 cup water

Boil the pasta according to package directions.

In the food processor chop the peanuts until they are crumbly. Set the peanuts aside.

Then use the food processor to finely chop all the chilis and garlic. Add the vinegar, soy sauce and water and mix together. Pour mixture over chopped peanuts to make your sauce.

Mix garbanzo beans and frozen veg together and heat in microwave. When hot mix in cooked pasta, raw shredded cabbage, cilantro and pour sauce over the top.

Bon Appetite!

If you are looking for other easy, healthy recipes, try the sample menus at http://www.savingdinner.com/


---------
She was not quite what you would call refined.
She was not quite what you would call unrefined.
She was the kind of person that keeps a parrot.
~ Mark Twain

Eternity lies ahead of us, and behind. Have you eaten enough ice cream?
 
Posts: 1119 | Location: island of misfit toys | Registered: January 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Adoration of the Modii
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I have several recipes for several cuisines.. but what recipe is the problem.. any recipes people are looking for? Specific types.

Masque


-- Give a man a fish, he eats for the day; Teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime; Teach that man to cook, and he can feed the world....
***********************
Head chef in the Realm of Procrastination and Unproductivity, Dp.u.: "You want fries with that?"
Holder for the Golden Pineapple Pin.
------------------------------------------------
If it is on the plate, its food. If it crawls off the plate; Kill it and put it back on the plate.
------------------------------------
I love small furry creatures; especially in a good sauce.
 
Posts: 13941 | Location: In the Kitchen, Cooking Something. | Registered: March 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
the Wicked Little Critta
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quote:
Originally posted by Masque:
I have several recipes for several cuisines.. but what recipe is the problem.. any recipes people are looking for? Specific types.

Masque


Do you have anything simple along the lines of a pasta or chicken?

Note to self: Add recipes to this thread.


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Posts: 6928 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: November 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
*102 gold stars*
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This is good as a sauce or as a stir fry mixture. Works very well with duck (canard ala sodomie morte.) or tofu.


Spiced Plum Sauce:


A couple of inches of fresh ginger root. (peeled and diced)
3 red chillies (diced and seeded)
8 to 10 plums (quartered and stones removed)
30 ml of Balsamic vinegar.
150 grams of Muscavado sugar.


Put everything in a saucepan over a medium heat until the sugar has dissolved. Stirring occasionally let it bubble away for twenty minutes or so, until the plums have mushed down and the concoction is a soupy liquid. A simmer rather than a boil. Remove from heat and allow to cool for a bit. Place mixture in liquidiser or place hand liquidiser in mixture and liquidise to a consistency without chunks. Before serving return to heat for a few minutes to thicken.



This stuff is a nice little thing to be pretentious with. It just needs a little dusting on the plate as it can be strong when fresh. Nice with prawns.


Orange and Ginger Dust.


Two large unwaxed oranges.
Two inches of fresh root ginger. (peeled and cut into batons)
Quarter cup of sugar
Juice of half an orange.
1 cup water.


Preheat oven to 190C / 374F
Cover a baking tray in foil and lightly (smear it) oil with a flavourless oil.

Peel the zest from two large unwaxed oranges. Use a vegetable peeler to make sure that it comes away in long strips. Scrape away as much of the white pith as possible. Put the peel, ginger, sugar, juice and water into a saucepan and bring to the boil, stirring, until the sugar has dissolved. Simmer for about 6 minutes, until syrupy.

Drain and spread the peel and sugar onto the baking tray. Place in the middle of the oven for 10 minutes. If it's not dry and crisp after 10 minutes, put back for a couple more.

If the peel is charred at the edges then trim away the carbonised bits. Cut the unburned bits into smaller pieces and place in a coffee grinder / mill of some kind. Whirrr it about (I sometimes add some fresh ginger at this point.) to a powder. And that's your dust.





Hermits have no peer pressure
 
Posts: 8095 | Registered: April 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always wears a tie - just not around his neck
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The ducks have even invaded here!!!!! Gack!!! necro/homo ducks for dinner!!!!!!!!


Head of internal security of the Realm of Unproductivity and Procrastination,  
Catnip Master in the order of the Pineapple.
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Lost in Time.........and Space | Registered: February 23, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Her bite actually is worse than her bark.
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Here. I'll add my recipe for gravy and meatballs. (Disclaimer: I come from an Italian family. What we call "gravy" is what non-Italians call "sauce". I've discussed this with Alinda, and apparently it's just an Italian-American thing.)

Gravy:

Three large cans of tomato sauce (I prefer Tuturosso or Contadina)

One small can of tomato paste (I prefer Contadina's Italian Seasoning paste)

four or five garlic cloves, to taste, chopped
Parsley to taste
Oregano to taste
One or two bay leaves
salt and pepper to taste.
Red wine optional.

Mix all ingredients in large pot. Simmer over low heat for 2-3 hours, stirring often. Fill one large can of tomato sauce (after putting it in the pot, of course) with water and put that in too, it will prevent the gravy from becoming too thick.

Meatballs:

Ground beef (how much depends on how many you're feeding--but these freeze well)

eggs (guideline goes one egg per pound of meat)

Seasoned bread crumbs

Mix together beef, eggs, and crumbs in a large bowl. The meat should stick together easily and be a little dry. I usually just add the bread crumbs in gradually and judge when enough is enough. By now I've made these enough I know how much to add instinctively. Roll meat into ball form and drop into simmering gravy--leave to cook for 1-2 hours.

Boil your favorite pasta and voila! You have a complete meal.
 
Posts: 2538 | Location: Madrid, Spain | Registered: June 28, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Adoration of the Modii
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Sorry this is so long, and I know the recipes seem complicated, but they are easy and quick, I was just very detailed.

There are pasta recipes galore.. but whatever pasta you want to make.. remember.. don't add oil to the water, but DO salt it well.. about a good 1/4 cup in about 2 qts of water (gives the pasta room to grow and move around so they don't stick together.. as good stir of the pasta immediately after putting into the water help prevent sticking too). Bring the water to a boil (rolling boil is good), and then add the pasta. How much and what type we'll get to in a sec.. boil for about 6 minutes or until a piece of tested pasta is "firm, but still tender" (al dente). I usualy start testing the pasta at about 4 minutes.. oh and don't forget the lid.. it will help you bring the water to a boil quicker, but only cover to pot halfway with the lid after the pasta is put in.. and back a bit off the heat. When done, drain in a colander and rinse with cool water. This does two things: one, it keeps the pasta from carryover cooking and two, to rinses the excess starch off the pasta. Now we look to the sauce (cooked beforehand): light marinara sauces or cream sauces for thin pastas: angel hair, vermicelli, and small pastas like "ruffles".. these pastas are also really tasty with butter sauces and seafood (recipe follows). The larger pastas can take heavier meat sauces, and heavier cheese sauces (recipe follows). Oh and don't turn your nose down on the bottled pasta sauces.. they work in a pinch, and you can always "doctor" them with additional spices, vegetables, meat, and cheese (I do this frequently, quicker than doing it all from scratch). So with some basic knowledge on pastas and sauces, you can make a plethora of de-lish dishes. Oh and how it usually works is you make about a quarter-sized diameter of the "long" pastas or about 1/2 cup of the "shaped" pastas... raviolis are a bit different.. depending on size, about 4-6 raviolis per person (I should say "serving", because how many of us will eat only 6 ravioli) and you gently place them in boiling water and fish them out when they float to the surface of the water, then plunge in cool water to stop the cooking. Then toss in the sauce of your choosing, usually a marinara type, and sprinkle with freshly grated cheese (forget the canned stuff.. pound for pound, a solid block of good parmesan will cost you less than an equal amount of the canned stuff, and be better for you. An investment in a microplane grater will pay itself back in only a couple of uses.

now for the sauce recipes:

Seafood Sautee

1/4 stick butter
2 TBSP Extra virgin olive oil
(more butter or EVO as needed)
about 6 peeled & deviened shrimp (18-20 or 20-24) per person (you can also add a couple of any mumber of other firm fleshed seafod, like scallops, to this)
one shallot, minced finely
one onion, minced finely
1-2 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
appoximately 1c of chopped spinach (frozen will work too, thaw if frozen)
salt, pepper, and italian seasoning to taste
2 thinly sliced sun dried tomatoes (opt)
a scant handful of pitted calamata olives, crushed (opt)
1-2 tsp chopped pine nuts (opt)
about 3 Tbsp flour
white wine (resling is great) or vegetable broth with a little lemon juice added)

In a large saucepan on medium heat, melt the butter and oilve oil together.. add the shallots and onions to the pan while it is still cool, add a healthy pinch of kosher salt (better to contol the portions), stir the mixture until the onions and shallots become translucent, add the garlic, stir. Add in the seafood and toss until they become opaque (shrinp will take on a pink tinge), remove the seafood. Add the spinach and other optional ingredients and the seasonings. Stir the mixture well.. if it looks dry add a bit more EVO or butter (a tsp at a time). Turn down the heat to med low, add the flour a bit at a time, stirring to coat mixtire in the pan, when everything is coated add about a 1/2 cup of the liquid, stir, add another 1/2 cup.. it will thicken quickly. Add the seafood and toss to incorporate.. add more liquid as needed to make a light sauce. Taste and add addtional salt and pepper as needed. Spoon over and toss with angel hair, or fettuccini pasta (cooked).
Serves about 4.. can serve more, just make more pasta.

This next recipe is what I toss over elbow macaroni or "corkscrews" for what I call my "three cheese" Mac&cheese

2-3 cups of shredded, Motzerella, Colby, Provalone, and Swiss cheeses (or any combination of easily meltable cheeses (cheddar works in this recipe too.. Velveeta isn't a cheese.. it is one step down from plastic...)
1 c grated parmesan, anstiago, or romano cheese
2 TBSP butter or oilive oil (or a mix)
3 Tbsp flour
milk (1-2 c)
salt
pepper
grated nutmeg
prepared mustard
paprika (opt)
Texas Pete hot sauce (opt)

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil; in the meanwhile, heat the oil or butter in a pan over medium high heat and add the flour and a healthy pinch of salt... stir the mixture until it becomes a "sandy blond", turn dwn the heat to medium and add a cup of milk and stir.. if it soaks up quickly, add the other cup, season with a couple of pinches of salt, pepper and nutmeg. Stir. When it starts to bubble take it off the heat add the cheeses and a couple of tsp of prepared mustard. Taste and season. Keep sauce over low heat. To the pot of boiling water add the noodles (you realy want the shaped ones for this). Cook to al dente, drain, and place back into the pan with a pat of butter and a splash of milk (less than 1/4 c). Gently fold in the cheese mixture into the noodles.

Serves plenty. the cheese sauce is enough to coat 2 boxes of noodles. The leftovers can be reheated in the oven with the addition of peas adn turkey, for a really nice twist on turkey casserole.

I'll find my meatball and sauce recipes adn shoot those to the list too.

Masque


-- Give a man a fish, he eats for the day; Teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime; Teach that man to cook, and he can feed the world....
***********************
Head chef in the Realm of Procrastination and Unproductivity, Dp.u.: "You want fries with that?"
Holder for the Golden Pineapple Pin.
------------------------------------------------
If it is on the plate, its food. If it crawls off the plate; Kill it and put it back on the plate.
------------------------------------
I love small furry creatures; especially in a good sauce.
 
Posts: 13941 | Location: In the Kitchen, Cooking Something. | Registered: March 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always wears a tie - just not around his neck
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MMMMMMMM Pasta dishes

*slobbering*


Head of internal security of the Realm of Unproductivity and Procrastination,  
Catnip Master in the order of the Pineapple.
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Lost in Time.........and Space | Registered: February 23, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Doctor/Warrior/Hunter/Judge/Prey
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quote:
Originally posted by Ravenina:
(Disclaimer: I come from an Italian family. What we call "gravy" is what non-Italians call "sauce". I've discussed this with Alinda, and apparently it's just an Italian-American thing.)

Interesting. I come from a Sicilian family, and we all cringe any time we hear someone call sauce "gravy." Must be a regional thing as well. (We also prefer basil over oregano, which i'm also fairly sure is a regional difference.)

Anyway, ETA a recipe:

Holy Guacamole, Batman!

Ingredients:
3 medium sized avocadoes
1 small tomato (cluster tomatoes work well for this)
4-6 cloves garlic
1/2 sweet onion (white or red, either one)
1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon salt (to taste)
1-2 tablespoons lemon juice (to taste)
parsley or cilantro optional (be warned: with cilantro, a little goes a long way)

Directions:
Mince onion and garlic (easiest with food processor of some sort) together, place in bowl. Dice tomato very fine and add to bowl.

Slice avocadoes the long way around the pit, then scoop out the innards and set the pits aside. The innards go in the bowl (see how easy! Only one bowl!) with the rest of the stuff. Add salt and lemon juice (and optional ingredients) and mash everything together.

Once everything is well mixed, put the pits back in the bowl (this keeps the guac from turning brown as quickly), cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate about one hour. (Trust me on this one; it tastes much better when the flavors have had a chance to mix.)

Serve with tortilla chips and cerveza.
 
Posts: 7496 | Location: lurking beneath the floorboards of the old Twilight Cafe | Registered: August 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ok, ghetto style vegatarian cooking...
Fried Ramen

ingrediants:
2 packs oriental top ramen (or any other kind without meaty ingredients in the powder... or hell, if you like the meaty, get the meaty)

Block of firm tofu (or some sort of fake meat, or tempeh, or any kind of common meat substitute that'll hold up to stir frying. This is acctually optional)

A bag of frozen mixed oriental style vegatables

Minced/chopped garlic (i like it prechopped in the little jar)

Chili paste (also optional, but i think its the best part. Go for Samuel Olek's).

Prepared sauce (teryaki, peanut, whatever you want the tofu/meat substitute cooked in. Once more, this is optional)

Start boiling the water for your ramen. When it boils, add the two packs of noodles.

Heat oil (olive oil and a dash of seaseame oil work well) in a wok or frying pan. Take a forkfull (or two) of chopped garlic. Fry it for a minute or two. Add the tofu (or whatever the hell your using)
Fry it for another 3 mintues. Add the sauce if your using it.
meanwhile, your ramen should be done. Drain 90% of the water out (leave just about a tablespoon or little more). Mix in the seasoning packets.
Add the frozen vegtables to the skillet/wok. Stir around a little bit. Add the noodles, crank the heat up high and toss it around for a bit. remove from heat and eat. tada!


*--------------------------------*
I didn't know this was bat country
 
Posts: 1514 | Location: North eastern PA and at the heart of every little child... what? | Registered: December 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of dividethedestroy
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Circus:
quote:
Originally posted by Ravenina:
(Disclaimer: I come from an Italian family. What we call "gravy" is what non-Italians call "sauce". I've discussed this with Alinda, and apparently it's just an Italian-American thing.)

Interesting. I come from a Sicilian family, and we all cringe any time we hear someone call sauce "gravy." Must be a regional thing as well. (We also prefer basil over oregano, which i'm also fairly sure is a regional difference.)


or just that basil is better. Smile


*--------------------------------*
I didn't know this was bat country
 
Posts: 1514 | Location: North eastern PA and at the heart of every little child... what? | Registered: December 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Her bite actually is worse than her bark.
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quote:
Originally posted by destroythedivide:
quote:
Originally posted by Circus:
quote:
Originally posted by Ravenina:
(Disclaimer: I come from an Italian family. What we call "gravy" is what non-Italians call "sauce". I've discussed this with Alinda, and apparently it's just an Italian-American thing.)

Interesting. I come from a Sicilian family, and we all cringe any time we hear someone call sauce "gravy." Must be a regional thing as well. (We also prefer basil over oregano, which i'm also fairly sure is a regional difference.)


or just that basil is better. Smile


Razz
It's all about personal preference and what you grew up with. I did buy basil once, but keep forgetting I have it, so at least once I used both basil and oregano. I guess it was good, because I don't remember it being bad. I know at least part of my family is from Portenza, which I think is central Italy. (Alinda??? Help??) But really I don't know and I'm retarded when it comes to geography anyway.
 
Posts: 2538 | Location: Madrid, Spain | Registered: June 28, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
the Wicked Little Critta
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This is going to be my favorite thread. Howzat!


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Posts: 6928 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: November 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of dividethedestroy
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quote:
Originally posted by Ravenina:

It's all about personal preference and what you grew up with. I did buy basil once, but keep forgetting I have it, so at least once I used both basil and oregano. I guess it was good, because I don't remember it being bad. I know at least part of my family is from Portenza, which I think is central Italy. (Alinda??? Help??) But really I don't know and I'm retarded when it comes to geography anyway.



Honestly, I have no idea about my Italian roots as far as geography, though I've grown up with a lot of fresh basil. Just the smell itself gives me a little wood.


*--------------------------------*
I didn't know this was bat country
 
Posts: 1514 | Location: North eastern PA and at the heart of every little child... what? | Registered: December 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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