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is in perfect karmic alignment
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Picallilly. Smile


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Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Biscuitkeeper
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I experimented this weekend and made a very tasty ginger and garlic pork stir fry. I need to figure out where the tenderest parts of the ginger root are though. I think it's just the smaller offshoots, because some of it was a bit woody and bitter. Others were perfect.

Thinly sliced pork marinated in sherry, soy sauce and corn starch. Onion and ginger diced and cooked in oil for a few minutes and then remove. Stir fry pork with minced garlic and add onion/ginger mix at end. Serve over rice. Easy and Yum.


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Posts: 10767 | Location: Michigan | Registered: April 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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When I do ginger for the chicken curry I get it from the freezer (tip I googled) and grate it with the fine grater section - I bought a zester thingy and really dislike it. During the grating, it leaves behind fine strands. That stuff I throw away. Actually, I love the way it smells, so I let it sit in the kitchen for a while or put it in the bathroom.



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25366 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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Meatballs are on my blog. But i was wondering, how do you guys make yours? Any special secet ingredients?


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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Mine are: ground beef + sausage (general breakfast-type) generally served with tomato sauce, so basic Italian type seasonings: basil, oregano, black pepper, celery salt, some yellow curry powder (which isn't Italian, really, but I tend to put it many dishes 'cos I likes it) parsley flakes. bread cubes. celery blended with some cooked white onion and roasted garlic and green bell peppers. eggs. some wine. Run through the grinder, balled (I use a cookie scooper thingy) and boiled in chicken broth.

I suppose that's my biggest secret, that I boil them. It makes them very easy to cook a large batch (we usually do about 15 pounds at a time) they keep their shape well, they freeze well and thaw without falling apart (too much) and they stay juicy. Broth they got boiled in can be strained and used for soup. But it will need to be finely strained and then scoop off the fat. It seems like fat from the meatballs leeches out into the broth, but I don't really know if that's what happens.



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25366 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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*Nods* I finish them off in their gravy. It's just because i relish the lovely caramel from frying that i fry them off. (I should add that to the post maybe? It *is*, like you say, exactly that which makes them so moist). And, as always, yours are much more sophisticated Smile
There's a running gag about my cooking: it's not 'deformed' that's called 'rustic' and one always pretends it was *meant* to look like that.

I do meatballs in tomato-sauce too. Semi-Spanish style and will cravenly steal some of your suggestions, Maeve, thanks!


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My mom used to make a soup-like Chinese thing with tiny little meatballs in it.
I used to sit next to her as she made them, complaining loudly as each meatball turned out not exactly the same size as the last one.

My mom says she can't even describe how annoying that was.


__
I like it maybe 63 percent!
 
Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
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Re: ginger. I put peeled root through the vegetable juicer, and you get a tiny little dribble of nuclear reactor fuel ginger juice. It's ace - you can cook with it, or add hot water and sugar for a hot drink when you are feeling ill. A little goes a long way.

Re: meatballs. I now do what Maeve says (which is a good philosophy even when not cooking meatballs) and boil them in broth.


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15843 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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*blushes* aw thanks Hive!

But since she was making meatballs with gravy I would've fried 'em in a pan, too. Since they're already cooked I would likely saute some onions and then chuck in some thawed meatballs, and some good broth.

Ginger juice. That sounds really good. Pity I haven't got a juicer.



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25366 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Smartest woman in the world.
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Smitten Kitchen had a recipe for meatballs a couple of days ago, and then I saw this discussion, so I ended up making the meatballs, and they were pretty awesome. But I used ground dark meat chicken, and didn't have any parsley, so the meatballs ended up being little meat patties, instead. They were still pretty awesome. Next time, I would add in some breadcrumbs and actually remember fresh parsley so as to make them less goopy and actually stay round. Using white meat would help, too, but I don't think the flavor is as good. I'd chop the green onions smaller, too.


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Posts: 8092 | Location: On the 34th Floor | Registered: November 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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Chicken meatballs, even with white meat, will be more goopy. dunno why, but I've tried them before and they're just different. same thing with turkey.



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25366 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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quote:
Originally posted by Jocelyn:
Smitten Kitchen had a recipe for meatballs a couple of days ago, and then I saw this discussion, so I ended up making the meatballs, and they were pretty awesome. But I used ground dark meat chicken, and didn't have any parsley, so the meatballs ended up being little meat patties, instead. They were still pretty awesome. Next time, I would add in some breadcrumbs and actually remember fresh parsley so as to make them less goopy and actually stay round. Using white meat would help, too, but I don't think the flavor is as good. I'd chop the green onions smaller, too.

I'm trying this one as we speak, and used beef. I added breadcrumbs because the mixture was too wet, and also added about 1/4 cup extra (light) soy sauce, because the regular one made it too sweet. Will report on the end result...

Update:
The sauce certainly needed the extra soy (and i almost *halved* the amount of brown sugar in the recipe i used about 60 grams*) and is just about perfect for my taste. The beef is a nice offset for the sauce, as it's very flavorful. It did, however, need the breadcrumbs. The sauce in the original recipe calls for reducing for about half an hour. It took me 45 minutes**.
Sticking with the original recipe gave me more than twice as much sauce as was needed. The rest will be refrigerated and used to feed another hungry visitor, i hope.
Random thought: when used as a small supper it can do with a wedge of lime. I served it with some noodles. That makes a rather festive though smallish supper.

*At a guess it depends very much on the soy-sauce you use. I used a good and pretty light japanese one.
So, it makes 1/2 cup of japanese soy sauce + 1/4 of a cup (thereabouts) of light soy sauce and 50 grams of brown sugar.
Also i used actual Mirin, which is also sweet.
YMMV, I guess.
**To get an actual, nice, sweet-and-savory but above all *sticky* dipping sauce that would stay on the meatball. So you mighn't need the extra time for it to be a sauce, instead of a nice sticky dipping sauce.

P.S. Oh drat, i forgot to say. It got rave reviews, was loved, and nommed. Also it gave rise to the remark that "if these are your experiments, please go on 'experimenting'"

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Punkyfins,


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
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quote:
Originally posted by Punkyfins:
Picallilly. Smile

I meant to ask - if you ever want mustard powder posting to you, it's very commonly available and cheap, here, and would travel well, so just let me know!


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15843 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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Thank you Hive! *hugs*. Like i said on the blog, the picallilli is fine without it. And because none of my other pickles ever use any, ever (just mustardseed) it might not be worth it. But thank you so much!

-*-

Speaking of pickles:
As it's dark and rainy and dark and miserable, and also because Roomie polished off nearly all the picallilli last time (as the readers of my blog may know, I was also inspired by an oddly prophetic post i'd written in May or thereabouts) I wanted to do a pickle experiment.

I used half the 'slicing' cucumber left over from the picallilli batch for a bold and daring experiment*. Razz

I'll try fermented 'real' dill pickles too, but was tempted by a cheat for fridge-dill-cheaty pickles, which i also want to try.
I've settled on a sweet-and-sour briney mix.

Because I'm using the wrong kind of cucumber I'm preparing by my tried-and-true method. Salt 'em and put ice on. Drain.

Now, here's the thing. Smitten kitchen's bread and butter ones don't use dill, but do use (a lot of) sugar.
The cheaty ones use far less sugar, water and a bread and butter/dill pickle mix.
And i can't quite decide what to go for.

Here's the preliminary plan (for a pound)**:
3/4 cups vinegar
about 25 grams sugar to 1/4 cup
about a tablespoon of seasalt
About half a tablespoon each of coreander and mustardseeds
a teaspoon of dill seeds
two sprigs of dill
two scallions (whites only)

Ideas?

*Yes, i know I'm not supposed to. It isn't pickling season though and it's an experiment, and why not use leftovers.. Aaahnd so on.
**As this has been adapted from several sources and my own -limited- knowledge it's a mash-up of measurements. One cup is about 200 ml. The salt levels have been adapted to make up for the conundrum of kosher salt's saltness (believe it or not). And yes i know the salt i use has iodine and anti-caking agents that might cloud the brine. But it's my belief they'll only cloud the brine in fermented pickles and it's perfectly fine for a regular old bread-and-butter one. Because it always has been.


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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The quicky-pickle experiment: prelim.

250 ml vinegar
50 grams honey
(about) half a tablespoon each of coreander and mustardseeds
a teaspoon of dill seeds
Sprigs of dill (I used three, which might be too little)
a bay leaf
half a cucumber
a scallion
salt

This will make about a 350 ml jar.

I made little fan shapes of the cucumber about half a cm thick. (So quarter it and slice) and quartered my scallion.
I put those in my sieve, salted them royally, put the sieve over the bowl and cover with ice. Leave like that for anywhere from an hour to two hours.

Heat the vinegar with the spices and the bay leaf. Meanwhile remove ice and rinse the veg in ice-cold water. Pack into your weck-jar with the sprigs of dill.
When the vinegar is good and hot, pour over the cucumber-mixture put on lid and leave to cool for a bit. Then refrigerate. Though the weck-jar will seal, this doen't mean it's a preserve by any stretch of the imagination. I use the weck-jar because it's heat-resistant. These are for the fridge. They need at least a good three hours there before they're any good.

(To preserve these would need at least 10 minutes in a hot water bath. But that hasn't been tested yet!)

Will report back on how they ended up. Smile

Eta:
They were very nice and crunchy. But the honey/vinegar mix was a little overpowering for the dill. I'll need to add a little water and maybe a pinch of salt. Thoughts?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Punkyfins,


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cooking Gods and Goddesses please help!

I want to cook frozen fish fillets. I only did it once before with mixed results but the basic idea which needs tweaking is this:

Dice garlic and cook in hot oil,
Salt frozen fish fillets and add
Cook briefly on both sides,
Add some water, close lid and turn down heat.
When fish is done, remove and add lemon juice and salt and pepper.
Reduce liquid, pour over fish.

Does this sound ok? Any advice for me?
Thanks!


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I like it maybe 63 percent!
 
Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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Sounds fine to me. Not sure I'd bother with garlic, but if you've already had this type of fish and like it with garlic, then go for it.



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25366 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vampiric Scottie-bat trainer

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My Dad always salts the fish, drizzles it with lemon juice and lets it defrost on a platter or large plate for a bit. The resulting juices form the basis of the sauce (add to pan after fish is done and out of the pan), to which he adds sour cream and lots of chopped dill. This way you don't need to add water only to reduce it again later.
And I'm not sure the garlic is a good idea - it might be too powerful for the rather delicate fish.
 
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Weirdy American Tart Thing
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mmm, I've changed my mind, Ceri's way sounds nommy!



Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
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Blogpost : shellfish


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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