Neil Gaiman    www.NeilgaimanBoard.com    www.NeilgaimanBoard.com  Hop To Forum Categories  The World's End  Hop To Forums  The World's End    the ALL NEW easy and yummy recipe thread
Page 1 ... 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 ... 68
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
the ALL NEW easy and yummy recipe thread
 Login/Join
 
Girded for battle
Member
Picture of aisha
posted Hide Post
Arr, cheers Hive. I too occasionally chuck in sesame oil when I'm cooking stir frys and such, and obviously you can't beat the saturated fatty goodness of butter-fried grub. S'just, I was looking at a recipe (for chips, of all things) which specifies groundnut oil. M'sure substituting with sunflower couldn't do much harm. I want to Experiment with sillily expensive bottles from the oil aisle in the supermarket, but christ... I've had that sesame oil for about 2 years and still only used a tiny bit, so I don't know if I can justify it!

[/oily ramble]
 
Posts: 1312 | Location: Glasgow | Registered: July 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
*102 gold stars*
Member
Picture of Cavenagh
posted Hide Post
Groundnut oil (Peanut oil in the states) has a high smoke point, and is flavour neutral. So you can sub Groundnut with Sunflower, Safflower, or Rapeseed (Canola for the squeamish states). Good for frying yer chips.

Olive oil, well, for sautéing don't bother with extra virgin. That (like nut oils) is best for cold applications, and is too pricey to cook with when normal Olive oil does the same job. It has a lower smoke point than the above oils, so watch out.

Sesame oil I would use as the last ingredient of a stir fry not the principle cooking fat. It has a low smoke point and so not compatible with the temps that a stir fry should be done at. Best drizzled into rice that is then fluffed I find anyways.





Hermits have no peer pressure
 
Posts: 8099 | Registered: April 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
Member
Picture of Hive
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Cavenagh:
Sesame oil I would use as the last ingredient of a stir fry not the principle cooking fat. It has a low smoke point and so not compatible with the temps that a stir fry should be done at. Best drizzled into rice that is then fluffed I find anyways.

I use mine to dribble on top of noodle soups and the like.


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
*102 gold stars*
Member
Picture of Cavenagh
posted Hide Post
Dribbling is an art form in itself.





Hermits have no peer pressure
 
Posts: 8099 | Registered: April 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
Member
Picture of Hive
posted Hide Post
I am a MASTER DRIBBLER.

Wait...

Actually, when I think about it, with a lot of my cooking I tend to add the fat last, even at the serving stage. Except with meat, where it is usually built-in from the start.


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has no front teeth
Member
Picture of BeeZee
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by aisha:
I haz question for the all-knowing chefs of the Board. Do you guys use different kinds of oils for different recipes? If you substitute one for another in a recipe, is it likely to affect the taste, or is the smoke point the most important thing? This is coming from someone for whom olive oil is an exotic change from sunflower oil....


Most Chinese places here use peanut (groundnut) oil in the actual frying and sesame in the sauces and..er...yes, dribbled.

I have subbed other high smoke-point oils for sir frying, but it always tastes like something's missing. I guess what you're used to is what tastes "right".


______________________
Fandangling across the moony sky,
went the Beezee bold as brass,
side-saddle she sat, on a big painted bat,
shooting moonbeams out of her a(censored)e.
~Joe
________________________
Isn't sanity really just a one trick pony, anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick, rational thinking! But when you're good and crazy¦ooh ooh ooh the sky's the limit!



 
Posts: 24418 | Location: With my weird little family | Registered: March 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
Member
Picture of Maeve
posted Hide Post
I grew up calling this dish 'goulash' which is actually a Hungarian stew and completely different. I thought it was a regional thing, like how we call green bell peppers 'mangoes' (no, I don't understand why) but a quick google shows me that Americans all over call this dish Goulash. I think it's more accurately a Bolognese sauce, but what do I know. It's my version of Hamburger Helper. Smile

I make a lot so that I have extra to put in the freezer for another meal when I don't much feel like cooking. The exact amounts for ingredients are vague simply because it doesn't much matter, as long as there's tomatoes in there and it's saucy, it'll be good. Also, I don't fry the onions and peppers and garlic, but you can do that if you prefer the taste.

Also, I chuck everything in the blender because that's how I grew up with this. Mum was feeding a picky child and I still don't much like chunks. And my kid is also picky, if he knew he was eating carrots he prolly wouldn't scarf down this dish like he does now. Smile

In a large pot chuck some
carrots (cup your hands together, however many carrot chunks fits in your cupped hands)
celery (double hand cup at least, maybe triple)
green bell pepper (one large, cut off the stem and remove seeds)
garlic (at least one large clove, I usually use two or three)
onion (one baseballish sized white onion, chunked)
basil, oregano, whatever herbs you think you'd like in a tomatoey sauce.
tomato sauce (1 quart jar: if all you have is paste, then add some water)

Bring to a boil and cover and simmer all those ingredients, if it seems like too much liquid is lost, add some water. When the carrot chunks are soft enough let it cool a bit and run it through the blender or food processor until smooth. (if you like it chunky, don't do this step)

Return that sauce to the pot, add another quart jar of tomato sauce (or stewed tomatoes or crushed tomatoes) some dry red wine salt, black pepper, I add curry powder because I like it, but you don't have to, some brewed coffee (optional) Let it simmer, stir occasionally.

Brown some ground beef (or turkey or chicken or beef+veal or lamb or I'm sure you could even use tofu, although I've never tried that) This can be chunky, doesn't have to be finely ground like for spaghetti sauce. Add that to the sauce and let it simmer for a while. at least an hour.

Boil some macaroni noodles (or pasta of your choice) pour the sauce over, add some grated parmesan.

Like I said, I don't know what to call it, but it's a fairly quick meal that everyone likes. I suppose you could even do it in a crockpot? I just like it 'cos it's quick, I get veggies in there and I have an extra meal or so, ready in the freezer for when I don't feel like cooking.


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Adoration of the Modii
Member
Picture of Masque
posted Hide Post
great recipe, Twin..

heh.. I remember when I was young and these snowbirds came to live in our subdivision.. they were from Ohio and called bell peppers "mangoes".. I asked what they called mangoes then.. and they said "mandangoes"... what do you call mango the fruit?


-- Give a man a fish, he eats for the day; Teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime; Teach that man to cook, and he can feed the world....
***********************
Head chef in the Realm of Procrastination and Unproductivity, Dp.u.: "You want fries with that?"
Holder for the Golden Pineapple Pin.
------------------------------------------------
If it is on the plate, its food. If it crawls off the plate; Kill it and put it back on the plate.
------------------------------------
I love small furry creatures; especially in a good sauce.
 
Posts: 13941 | Location: In the Kitchen, Cooking Something. | Registered: March 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
Member
Picture of Maeve
posted Hide Post
Well, until I moved to California I never saw a mango fruit.


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
Member
Picture of Hive
posted Hide Post
When I was little, we lived in Jamaica for a while (in town), and the passage at the side of the house was a buzzing carpet of wasps laid over a sweet mushy layer of fallen mangoes. We couldn't eat all that our few trees produced, and people used to knock on the door asking for spares (which we always had).


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vampiric Scottie-bat trainer

Member
posted Hide Post
I just bought my very first non-carving pumpkin at the Pumpkin Festival on my way to work!

It's dark green, pumpkin-shaped (well, classic pumpkin), and the sign said it's a "Sweet Mama" pumpkin.

Now I need recipes!

The problem is, 1) the lower heating thingy in our oven is busted, so no baking (top heat is fine, so roasting should be possible), and 2) I don't own a blender or food processor (I've been planning to buy a hand blender as soon as I find an affordable one), so no blending/pureeing.

Any suggestions, oh punkin-wise folk?
 
Posts: 8222 | Location: Bärlin | Registered: October 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
Member
Picture of Maeve
posted Hide Post
I nuke it in the microwave. Cut it into chunks that will fit in a microwaveable dish, scoop out the seeds and the stringy bits, place it in the dish and nuke on high about 8 minutes (depending on your microwave, mine's a large-ish one. Then it'll probably need to cook some more, poke it with a fork all over, it should be baked potato texture all over. If it isn't, nuke it some more until it is. Then scoop it out of the rind and mash it. You will likely need to strain it, it will likely be nearly applesauce texture/moisture and for pie it should not have that much extra moisture. Cheesecloth or I use a very fine mesh strainer.

Are you planning pie or soup? 'Cos soup prolly wouldn't need to be strained.

ETA: You didn't mention a microwave and it's possible you don't have one. er... maybe you could steam it in a pot with a bit of water? I dunno, I've never tried that, I just nuke it.

and my Drunken Pumpkin Pie recipe is way back in the thread


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Companion to owls
Member
Picture of cloverheart
posted Hide Post
You can peel it and cut it in chunks and use it for a Thai-style curry with coconut milk, it goes great with it!


 
Posts: 11803 | Location: home? | Registered: June 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Companion to owls
Member
Picture of cloverheart
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Cavenagh:

Olive oil, well, for sautéing don't bother with extra virgin. That (like nut oils) is best for cold applications, and is too pricey to cook with when normal Olive oil does the same job. It has a lower smoke point than the above oils, so watch out.


I use the same exrta virign olive oil for everything :P
(Then again, I don't fry much and still most of my fellow countrypepople think it odd, they'd use a cheaper olive oil for frying or even mix olive and sunflower. But I still think the taste of a fried egg or homemade chips in etxra virgin olive oil is the best thing ever.)


 
Posts: 11803 | Location: home? | Registered: June 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
Member
Picture of Hive
posted Hide Post
Pumpkin: I've only ever steamed/boiled it (then mushed it up for mash or soup or pie), or roasted it. The advantage of roasting is that you can leave the skin on, which makes it easier. (I suppose you could do that with steaming, too, it's just I never have.)

I actually like it as a mushy side dish, mashed with a potato masher or a fork, mixed with a little butter and black pepper.

Also roasted little chunks mixed with cooked and drained tagliatelli and a wee bit of ricotta, again with a bit of black pepper on the top, is fabulous and so, so easy.


***********************
"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vampiric Scottie-bat trainer

Member
posted Hide Post
Thanks for the hints, ! Smile

Pie is not gonna be an option due to oven issues, I'm afraid.
Soup was my next thought, but no blender is making that hard too.
I do have a microwave! Smile
Thai curry sounds awesome! I *love* Thai curry! I just don't know if I can pull one of, never made it before...

I basically just need a pile of possibilities to choose from, since I've never made anything with pumpkin before.
Cheap would be good too - we're talking very slim student budget here.
 
Posts: 8222 | Location: Bärlin | Registered: October 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Companion to owls
Member
Picture of cloverheart
posted Hide Post
Thai curry is easy peasy!!

Easiest way: buy some nice quality Thai curry paste, green, red, whatever. How do you know it's nice? Read the ingredients -a good curry paste will have no artifitial flavourings, it's all made of herbs and spices. The list should include ginger, galangal, Thai basil, coriander, garlic, cumin, turmeric, lemongrass, chilli...

Once you have your paste, choose your ingredients for the curry. My default curry:

Courgettes
Onions (shallot, red, white, doesn't matter)
Carrots
Mangetout
French green beans
Aubergine
Pumkin/Squash

All cut in chunks, aubergine larger chunks so it doesn't get too soft, pumpkin in smaller ones so it doesn't take forever.

Oil to pan, medium to high heat.
Add pumkin/squash and brown on all sides. It should brown on the outside while still cook in the inside -if it browns too quickly, lower the heat. MAke sure you turn often.
When pumkin is getting almost soft throguh and through, add all your other veggies and brown and stir.
Once they started getting color and ebcome softer, but not too soft, add your paste -let's say a spoonful.
Stir all together for a few minutes.
Add coconut milk enough to cover everything almost completely.

Stir well, lower the heat to low and let it simmer until everything is tender -5 or 10 minutes should do. If it take slonger, the veggies will become too soft, even though it'll still taste good. Add chopped fresh coriander and serve!

Once you've mastered this, you can experiment with using fresh herbs and spices as well as the paste, to customise it to your taste.


 
Posts: 11803 | Location: home? | Registered: June 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vampiric Scottie-bat trainer

Member
posted Hide Post
Hmm, as tasty as that sounds, clover, it would be a little too expensive and time consuming for my purposes.
I think I'll scoop it out so I can still use it for carving afterwards) and try Hive's two hints. The pumpkin is just big enough for two portions.
 
Posts: 8222 | Location: Bärlin | Registered: October 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Companion to owls
Member
Picture of cloverheart
posted Hide Post
(It would take you 40 min for the whole thing, actually, including cutting and peelings the veggies. As for expensive, you can use any veg or meat you like and curry paste is maybe less than €3 and lasts forever. Don't rule it out forever! Big Grin)


 
Posts: 11803 | Location: home? | Registered: June 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
Member
Picture of Maeve
posted Hide Post
How difficult is it to make hummus? (and do we already have a recipe lurking in here and I'm just too lazy to search?)

I've had it a few times. at first it was bleh, I don't like this, tried a different brand and that was OK, but nothing fabulous. The Athenos brand that I found at the grocery store is fair, but it could do with some more garlic I think and less salt. I like the slight spice of the roasted red peppers though, but I'm baffled why they put HFCS in it.

So - anyone have a recipe they've used and liked? and I don't have a food processor, just a blender, so is that useable?

Oh and do I have to use canned chickpeas? I generally don't like the taste of canned foods.

ETA: Can you us flax seeds instead of sesame seeds? I've read a lot on how flax seeds are just awesome, but I don't really know where to use them.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Maeve,


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 ... 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 ... 68 
 

Neil Gaiman    www.NeilgaimanBoard.com    www.NeilgaimanBoard.com  Hop To Forum Categories  The World's End  Hop To Forums  The World's End    the ALL NEW easy and yummy recipe thread

© YourCopy 2001