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the ALL NEW easy and yummy recipe thread
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has no member title
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quote:
Originally posted by Limertilly:
with 1), fion is right. with 2), i would actually remove the onions from the pan for long enough to brown the meat, then chuck them back in. they'll still have all the onion juices and so on, without risking burning the onions, because that is bitter and nasty.


Thanks, I was afraid the freezing would spoil the ginger root.


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Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is currently hovering somewhere near Saturn
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no, and it only lasts a few days in the fridge. you can rescue it if it goes mouldy, by just cutting off the mouldy bits, but once it shrivels...


Limertilly: A pagan deity forgotten by man and therefore banished to the realms of memory and darkness now remembered by a young girl in downtown L.A. in the form of a dream and therefore freed to reap your revenge on the people who discarded you, thereby forcing said girl to learn to use her innate yet awesome powers as a soothsayer to gather forces of the Earth to defy you and once more banish you to your cold, cold prisoooooon

blog: http://limertillysfoodporn.wordpress.com/

My sister's band, what I am very very proud of: www.bit.ly/toodar
 
Posts: 26268 | Location: your left ear | Registered: June 28, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Girded for battle
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a-HA. All my ginger woes are starting to make sense. Should you peel the root before freezing it, then?
 
Posts: 1312 | Location: Glasgow | Registered: July 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oestre sparagmos!
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i don't bother, but then i grate it peel and all into my food (i use a really fine grater). i guess it might be worth it if you desperately don't want the peel, although i imagine you could probably peel it pretty easily frozen as well.


____________________________________________________
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Posts: 10543 | Location: deepest darkest somerset | Registered: December 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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quote:
2) If a recipe tells you to cook loads and loads of onions in a pan, then add meat and brown it *hard*, how do you do that? If the heat is high the onions go black and if it is low, everything suddenly loses tons of water and the meat ends up getting boiled instead of fried. (Yeah, you'd think after ten years of cooking I'd have solved the problem.)


I use a seperate non-stick pan for browning the meat. The onions are best when cooked over a very low heat, for longer in a cast iron pan. So i usually just get the onions going, do the meat seperately and chuck the meat into my onions.
If i don't use this cheat, i move the onions to the far side of the pan, so that an open space is in the middle of the pan. Turn up heat, fry off meat *quickly* keeping a paraniod eye on the onions and turn the heat down asap.

The last option as it turns out dow not work with meat from the supermarket: because it contains too much water. Should work fine with high quality stuff.
However, for your own peace of mind i'd reccomend cheating and using a seperate pan, or (as limer says) put the onions to the side.


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Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is in perfect karmic alignment
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Fins' tabouleh.

This time i've used two tomatoes i've left "sunning" for the express purpose, half a cucumber and a quarter zucchini. Spice it up with a handfull of mint.
My aunt -who taught me how to make this- always peeled the tomato. You can if you want. I like the chewy bits Wink. I would however advise against using tinned as there's too much vinegar (and sugar!) in them.
You chop all of it up and put it into a bowl that's double the size of the amount of ingredients you have now.
Put the couscous in. (I've always used 'medium' but the super only had one kind, and it's "biological" apparently so triple the price. What does that even *mean*. But okay) I used about 200 grams.

Stir well until all your ingredients are covered in couscous. Season with salt and pepper.
Juice half a lemon and half a lime, or about a whole lemon. Pour in. Stir more. And stir some more. Then you need one cup of olive oil (your fave. Use extra vierge if you want.) And stir. Then stir some more.

Cover, chuck in fridge, remember to stir from time to time.

If it's still dry after about three hours add some water, or some more olive oil even.

Now you have a nice side for your BBQ, or in my case a couscous salad, to which i add spring onion, cherry tomatoes and whatever else strikes my fancy.


-------------------
Blog: Room with a view.

~You are a *Taverner*.
Sometimes patrons want to go where everybody knows their names, though it helps when half of them are named John. When people want to celebrate, or commiserate, they gather to your establishment. You provide the atmosphere, the warmth, rum, and even an ear to bend. Did I mention the rum? Years before the language will be mangled with terms like facilitator and networking and interpersonal communication, you've overseen it all, and broken up a few bar fights, to boot.~
-Royko

 
Posts: 8667 | Location: Just north of Earth | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
enlightened website user
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That sounds lovely, Punkyfins! Can you send some thru the tubes, please - I don't want to go shopping. Wink


(not his real name)
 
Posts: 6861 | Location: darned eff I know | Registered: June 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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(Because Hive asked for it, even though it's not exactly 'easy')



Vat of Barbeque Sauce

4 quarts of tomato sauce
2 cups booze (I usually use whiskey)
2 cups apple cider vinegar
2 cups dark molasses
1 cup Worcestershire sauce
6 Tbsp lime juice (I use bottled stuff unless limes are cheap)
1 pound carrots, cleaned and cut into chinks
1 head of celery, cleaned and cut into chunks
1 fresh pineapple, pureed
1 cup brewed coffee
several large cloves of garlic
several jalapeno peppers, seeded
1 large white onion
1/4 cup dried parsley flakes
1/2 tsp cocoa powder
fresh herbs such as basil, oregano, cilantro, guesstimates, about 1/8 cup each
Guesstimates: (season to taste)
celery salt
black pepper
yellow curry powder
red pepper flakes


Everything in this recipe is optional, add more or less of whatever you like best.

You need a huge sauce pot for all this.

I drain the tomato sauce into a pot and use that to cook the carrots, celery, onions, peppers, parsley flakes. I also pour the coffee in there. Boil everything, stir occasionally, until the carrots are soft. Puree all of it in a blender, then add to the main sauce pot, which has the tomato sauce, molasses, apple cider vinegar, booze, worcestershire sauce, celery salt, black pepper, yellow curry powder and cocoa powder.

Cut the skin off the pineapple, cut the core out (sneak a few pieces 'cos they're tasty) and puree the rest in a blender) add that to the main sauce pot.

Simmer for a few hours until it's thick, pour about half the pot into a fire safe pan and smoke it on a low fire (I prefer apple and maple) for about an hour, then add that back to the sauce pot.

That bit is optional as well, if you can't do this bit, add some wood smoke flavouring or just omit that part.

Yes, it's a huge amount of sauce - I process it in pint jars and store in my pantry in te basement. In my area I have never found a good, reasonably priced barbeque sauce that wasn't full of corn syrup or fake spices or mesquite smoke flavouring. I don't like mesquite or hickory.

That's why I make a vat o' sauce, it's for future meals as well as right now. But you could easily cut it in half or quarters and just use canned pineapple.

I like boiling up a chunk of pork loin, then using that liquid to boil some rice, shred the pork into some barbeque sauce, serve over the rice, add a side veggie and call it a meal. It's quick and comforting in the dead of winter.


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
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Thanks, Maeve. (How on earth did you discover that coffee, of all things, worked in this?)


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"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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years ago, somewhere on the internet, someone said to add coffee to your spaghetti sauce. so I tried it and it's good.

I like experimenting with food. Smile


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've never never ever heard the coffee trick before! I can't even imagine what that tastes like in spaghetti sauce. Must try as soon as possible. Big Grin

I just tossed together:
- salad leaves (different kinds)
- cucumber
- gorgonzola
- small red onions in rings
- browned pine nuts

With a dressing made of:
balsamico vinegar, olive oil, salt and seasoning, honey and...a dollop of goat cheese spread (because it seemed like a good idea).

Served it with focaccia bread. Smile
Sooooo good! Though the gorgonzola is a bit strong for the pine nuts. But I don't like walnuts.

Any ideas of other things to do with pine nuts, since they were so hellishly expensive?


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Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Weirdy American Tart Thing
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Are pine nuts in pesto sauce?

Oh and the coffee thing - I waited until we were already having spaghetti, and scooped some out into a separate bowl to taste it. That way I didn't mess up the whole pot. And it's just coffee, no milk in it, no sugar. And yes, it does sound really weird, but it gives a sort of smokey, slightly acid-y taste.


Minister of Kraftwerk in the Realm of U & P, Order of the Pineapple with frond for advancement in Nap studies.


The brain: not always amenable to logic. ~Hive

 
Posts: 25427 | Location: under tangled yarn | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
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quote:
Originally posted by Maeve:
Are pine nuts in pesto sauce?

Yes, they are! And homemade pesto is lovely: basil, olive oil, toasted pine nuts, and a bit of parmesan. Plus garlic if you like it, and salt and pepper. Don't stint on the olive oil. Whizz up in a food processor for a bit.


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"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: April 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hm...I dunno, I can buy some really good pesto ready made, so I am loath to crush all my pine nuts to make my own!
*is difficult*


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Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Melittosphex sapiens
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Baklava? Otherwise, carry on as you were, and just add them toasted on top of salads.


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"bring on the be-tentacled oppressors" - fluffyllama
 
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lives deliberately
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Alaura's Thrown-Together Tuna Noodle Stuff:

Box-o-pasta shells
Can-o-tuna
Bottle-o-alfredo sauce
Package-o-frozen peas
Fresh sprigs-o-dill
1/4 cup-o-lemon juice
Dash-o-Old Bay
Bag-o-Italian Cheese mix (or freshly grated romano, asiago, parmesan)
1/4 cup-o-breadcrumbs (set aside)

Boil pasta.
Drain.
Toss rest of stuff together with pasta.
Put stuff in casserole dish.
Sprinkle stuff with breadscrumbs.
Bake at 350 for 15 minutes.

Eat.


ego forceps ergo ego forceps


****
"Chives?"�
"Yes, m'lud?"�
"Is that Ms Ephemera hovering over the croquet lawn?"�
"Indeed m'lud. She's marshalled all the haggle-dans. Missy-twigs and vale-nymphs from Claypole Woods. Apparently she intends to tear this house down and dance on the ruins."�
"Well, Chives, you'd better start the car, what? And pack my tennis things too"�
--- Joe 3Heads
 
Posts: 11426 | Location: In a perpetual state of Ohio | Registered: December 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oestre sparagmos!
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what is alfredo sauce?


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Did you know? When it snows, my eyes become large and the light that you shine can't be seen.

EP now available for FREE download! Click Here

"Fairytales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten"

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Posts: 10543 | Location: deepest darkest somerset | Registered: December 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Hive:
Baklava? Otherwise, carry on as you were, and just add them toasted on top of salads.


I think I'll try adding it to rice next.
Hm..Baklava has pine nuts? Sounds good, anyway.


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Posts: 15475 | Location: Bouncing round in bathrooms! | Registered: October 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by aisha:
a-HA. All my ginger woes are starting to make sense. Should you peel the root before freezing it, then?


Yes. I didn't use to, till the Chef Boy pointed out that ginger peel is terribly bitter (which I'd noticed), also it makes it easier to grate from frozen.
Also, if you're grating from frozen, use slightly more than whatever the recipe asks for. When you grate frozen ginger, half the amount of what you get is water, so it's not as intense as fresh ginger.

Noodles -pine nuts are delicious tossed over any type of salad or anything with spinach. toast them slightly on a dry pan to get the flavours out. It can also be delicious as a hummus topping.


 
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*102 gold stars*
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Sticky Piggy Tummy.

Pork Belly is cheap and good. I did things to it.

The oven was heated to 160c, for it has a fan. Fanless would be 180c,

Flop the belly skin side up on a rack in a roasting tin. Give it a little trickle of oil, coarse sea salt and cracked white pepper corns.

Put in oven for an hour.

Take out of oven.

Baste.

Put it back in the oven for another hour and a half, returning to baste when you remember. Often is good.

Remove from the oven. In the bottom of the roasting tin I made a bed of rosemary sprigs onto which were delicately laid potatoes, butternut squash, carrots (all cut into about a 2 inch dice)and some garlic cloves, still in their paper. Lots of pepper. I like pepper. Stuck rack with pork belly back. Liberally smeared cumin, minced chillies and honey over the skin.

Stick back in oven and increase temp to 180c (200c fanless ones)for another 40mins.

Occasionally remembered to baste.

Remove from oven, allow to rest. While it rests, squeeze out the garlic into the roasting tray and mix the veggies up.








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