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Only sounds like Keith Flint
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Hey so, you guys read way more than I do. I'm looking for a new read. I typically like stuff that is unconventional and provocative. I was wondering if there was anything like that in the YA age range.

Fantasy, Sci Fi and Horror are preferred. General Lit is good if it is surreal. Ideas?
 
Posts: 2193 | Location: LA... sort of. | Registered: April 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
*Special Achievement Award Winner 2010* shines on like the stars
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"Little Bother"


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Life is too short to read a bad book.
 
Posts: 2485 | Location: Page 42 | Registered: December 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not too sure what you mean by 'unconventional' but I've recently been pointed to and enjoyed Kelly Link's short stories.


~
I prefer to live in a country that's small, and old, and where no one would ever have the NERVE to wear a cape in public, whether they could leap tall buildings in a single bound or not.

the parrot... ...gets tiresome.
the parrot... ...i ate him.


CHIKKINZ?
 
Posts: 20596 | Location: England | Registered: June 21, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only sounds like Keith Flint
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Thanks, guys! I'll check those out.

By "unconventional", I mean, something that doesn't follow the trends or standards of modern YA fiction. Something DIFFERENT.
 
Posts: 2193 | Location: LA... sort of. | Registered: April 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
is imperfectly illuminated
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I'm afraid I don't know what the trends are in YA fiction...

but I'd try China Mieville's UnLundun, it's a very good YA work.


---------------
*is currently impressed*
 
Posts: 8147 | Location: London, England | Registered: July 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
was not written by a man named "Cougar"
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You might try The Pearl Wars by Nick James.

It's a quick read and not overly complicated, but the story is interesting. Plus it was recently picked up and featured by Scholastic, which is a good endorsement.

(Disclamer: I also grew up with the author and his sister, so I'm not entirely unbiased here.)


----------------
Duck...duck...duck...duck...BOOBS!

 
Posts: 4109 | Location: Tacoma! (Because really, who wants to live in Seattle?) | Registered: October 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Goofy Beast
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No idea whether German author Michael Ende is famous for anything other than The Neverending Story in the English-speaking world, but I can very much recommend Momo, which I still re-read every now and then. Same for The Neverending Story, by the way; both novels deal with fairly complex themes and are wonderful reads. I don't know whether the translations are any good, though - in the original there's none of the patronising talking down to a younger audience, they're poetic but not flowery, but little ruins a book as much as a crappy translation.


__________
We scraped along like rats, but now we will soar like eagles... eagles on pogo sticks!
 
Posts: 10887 | Location: Switzerland | Registered: September 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
lives deliberately
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My favorite YA fantasy title to come out in recent years is The Lost Consipracy by Francis Hardinge. It's totally unconventional as a fantasy world...instead of having a Medieval European flavor to her universe, she bases her fantasy in a world that's derived from pacific island cultures and the clash between natives and colonists. Incredibly good stuff.

Terry Pratchett came out with "Nation" a few years back, which was also set on a tropical island about to be colonized.

If you like historical fiction, Laurie Halse Anderson wrote "Chains" and "Forge" which looks at the American Revolution from a slave's point of view.

MT Anderson writes highly unconventional YA fiction. He has his hands in many genres from historical fiction (The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing) to dystopian sci-fi (Feed).

Scott Westerfeld is really good at being on the cutting edge of literary trends...his Uglies series popularized dystopian fiction for teens and his Leviathan series is deliciously steam punk. I don't know if you consider these to be mainstream trends in YA fiction, but they certainly are worth reading.

If you're looking for a good survival tale, Revolver by Marcus Sedgewick is a chiller.

Then there's Brian Selznick, who wrote The Invention of Hugo Cabret and now Wonderstruck, both of which are gorgeously illustrated novels.

I've got plenty more to recommend (I used to work for a children/YA book review service) but those would be a good place to start! Enjoy!


ego forceps ergo ego forceps


****
"Chives?"�
"Yes, m'lud?"�
"Is that Ms Ephemera hovering over the croquet lawn?"�
"Indeed m'lud. She's marshalled all the haggle-dans. Missy-twigs and vale-nymphs from Claypole Woods. Apparently she intends to tear this house down and dance on the ruins."�
"Well, Chives, you'd better start the car, what? And pack my tennis things too"�
--- Joe 3Heads
 
Posts: 11426 | Location: In a perpetual state of Ohio | Registered: December 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only sounds like Keith Flint
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Thanks, all! I'll look into this list. You guys are a great help.
 
Posts: 2193 | Location: LA... sort of. | Registered: April 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My current favourite YA author is John Green (Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan) and The Fault in Our Stars). I haven't read everything by him yet, but I can highly recommend The Fault in Our Stars, with Looking for Alaska a close second. They're more realistic fiction, but Will Grayson, Will Grayson (which I haven't read yet) has a definite SciFi element, so you might try that.
 
Posts: 8222 | Location: Bärlin | Registered: October 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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