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Terry Pratchett
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if you want, skip it. but it does give you background info on Ankh-Morpock.
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by glassprisoner:
Wow. I guess I missed the whole DiscWorld bandwagon. Even though it's a bit late, I think I would like to try to jump on. Not that I usually condone liking something because it is widely like, but in this case I will make an exception. Should I restart Color of Magic, or can I skip that one?


If you skip it, you won't miss much in the sense of plot or anything. Each book is pretty much self contained beyond the first two. But it really is quite a funny book once it gets rolling. Maybe read a few of the others so you'll see how funny Pratchett can be when everything is hitting right and come back to Colour when you know how good it'll get.

---
jello.
aka aron.
 
Posts: 1035 | Location: Cumming, GA USA | Registered: July 11, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by glassprisoner:
Wow. I guess I missed the whole DiscWorld bandwagon. Even though it's a bit late, I think I would like to try to jump on. Not that I usually condone liking something because it is widely like, but in this case I will make an exception. Should I restart Color of Magic, or can I skip that one?

I'd start with 'Mort'. That's the novel that got me into Pratchett many, many years ago. It's still my favourite of the Discworld novels. It's a pity the film never got made... frown

http://www.thetalents.co.uk

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Posts: 3 | Location: Derby, Derbyshire. UK | Registered: October 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Light Fantastic was the first I read. Shortly followed by an obsessive sprint through all the books he had published at the time. I've been keeping up ever since. Actually, Good Omens is how I found out about Gaiman. Gotta love Smoke and Mirrors.

As for favourites, Hogfather is up there, along with Jingo, Eric (just because of the name), and Lords and Ladies. I met him this past May, he was doing a tour and stopped in Victoria. He signed my copy of Eric by crossing out "Eric" and writing Eric underneath. What a strange fellow.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: badspam_solamic@hotmail.com | Registered: October 22, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i just finished reading Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. such a good book. i highly recommend it.
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by dayvd:
i just finished reading Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. such a good book. i highly recommend it.


I'm definitely gonna get that one. I always enjoyed Terry Pratchettt's childrens stuff more than his stuff for grown ups - not that there's THAT much difference, his childrens books being very complex childrens books, and his grown up books being fairly simple entertainments compared to most other things written for grown ups.

His Bromeliad trilogy (Truckers, Diggers, Wings) is still his unsung masterpiece.



- Michael

 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm definitely gonna get that one. I always enjoyed Terry Pratchettt's childrens stuff more than his stuff for grown ups - not that there's THAT much difference, his childrens books being very complex childrens books, and his grown up books being fairly simple entertainments compared to most other things written for grown ups.

His Bromeliad trilogy (Truckers, Diggers, Wings) is still his unsung masterpiece.

http://www.colin-smythe.com/images/brom2.jpg

- Michael http://www.physicsforums.com/avatars/calvin.gif




the reason why i love this book so much is because you can read it in different states of mind. see the entire story as a children's fairytale. or see the deep philosophy within. there are some really great theories and ideas. parts where it literally had me stop reading, put down the book, and just stare off into space thinking and recoiling from the impact of his words.
i heard about the zenith that is Bromeliad. but i also hear that it's next to impossible to obtain. i really want to read it.
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by dayvd:
i heard about the zenith that is Bromeliad. but i also hear that it's next to impossible to obtain. i really want to read it.


It shouldn't be too hard. Amazon lists it:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0385410441/qid=1035748051/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/102-9466110-4943344?v=glance&n=507846

They say there's 2 to 4 weeks delivery. It's probably because it's a British import. But it's definitely in print, so you should be able to get it.

- Michael

 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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woo-hoo!
remind me again when i get hunt down this job.
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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just finished Lords and Ladies.
sooooooooo good.
i love having the next book ready when i finish the previous one.
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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just finished Men at Arms.
now i must wait to read the next one. unless i compulsively buy it tomorrow...
big grin
 
Posts: 3684 | Location: seattle | Registered: July 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Starving artist doctor - well, not starving, but if you happen to have an extra biscuit lying around . . .
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The Nomes trilogy is in Easons. And Waterstones. And WH Smith. You got to have oneof them in America... It'll be in the kids sections.

------------------------------
'I'm insane. What's his excuse?'
 
Posts: 9036 | Location: Belfast, NI | Registered: April 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There's a line in Jingo that bothers me a lot. In one scene, Vimes says emphatically, "I am not a military man," showing displeasure at the suggestion. Now, I'm not a soldier, and I know myself well enough to know that I'm not that kind of person, but that was an unnecessary insult on an honorable profession.

Jingo is dedicated, "To all the fighters for peace." Is that supposed to mean that all soldiers are warmongering bastards?
 
Posts: 2627 | Location: Manila | Registered: October 15, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In the case of Vimes, that would be a deep, deep insult. He serves no person, as no policeman should, only justice and the principles of justice.

Given the title of the book, "Jingo," and the general behaviour of the various groups in the book, I'd say Pratchett's point was more that military exploration and conquest are no longer necessary.

Oh, I'm going to the special Hell.
-Captain Malcolm Reynolds
 
Posts: 48708 | Location: Concord, NH, USA | Registered: July 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ZoneSeek:
There's a line in Jingo that bothers me a lot. In one scene, Vimes says emphatically, "I am not a military man," showing displeasure at the suggestion. Now, I'm not a soldier, and I know myself well enough to know that I'm not that kind of person, but that was an unnecessary insult on an honorable profession.



Being taught to kill will NEVER be an honorable profession. SHAME ON YOU! What are you, some kind of stupid right wing asshole?

Military men MAY be a necassary evil for society - but they are a necessary evil the same way that prostitutes are. They are the scum of the Earth.

- Michael

[This message was edited by mtxx on November 25, 2002 at 08:33 AM.]
 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anyway, the post above shouldn't be taken ENTIRELY seriously - but I simply HAVE to ask - Have you seen Richard Attenborough's "Gandhi" movie? Now THAT movie must REALLY have pissed you off!! big grin

- Michael

 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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*ahum* *coughs*

I don't like him too much, prolly because I don't like it when it gets too 'fantasy' with dwarves and all...(I have no problems with the endless whatsoever, american gods are fine too, angels etc.)

so that's why i thought: let's read Mort. So I did that and i thought it was quite nice...until i got towards the ending. I thought the ending really really sucked...:(

as far goes my opinion

*withdraws*

"a voiceless song sang from within singing"
 
Posts: 1191 | Location: the Netherlands | Registered: November 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Being taught to kill will NEVER be an honorable profession. SHAME ON YOU! What are you, some kind of stupid right wing asshole?

Military men MAY be a necassary evil for society - but they are a necessary evil the same way that prostitutes are. They are the scum of the Earth.



I'm not going to go to far into this, but I definately disagree with your idea here. In fact, I find it somewhat stupid and ignorant. I see that you say it shouldn't be taken too seriously, but even still, to refer to those in the military as "The scum of the earth" even in jest is pretty damn obtuse and insulting. Yes it would be nice to live in a perfect world without the need for a military, but for you to completely bash the military as they keep you nice and safe at home, are called in for emergency work in times of hardship such as weather phenomenon, and aid other countries around the world rebuild, it shows a very selfish and uninformed attitude.

I served in the Canadian Military for a time and did embark on peace keeping missions and was very active during the Ice Storm a few years back that left much of the country without power for weeks, and then I find close minded statements like this being made, it causes me to become just a little bit ticked off. My brother serves in the Canadian Navy and one of my best friends is a Marine in the United States Military and is stationed in the Middle East as I write this note.

I'm not saying I agree with war, but to say that there is no way a military proffesional could not be honorable is awful. Say that to the soldiers helping out next time they are clearing fallen trees after a storm or laying sand bags to prevent a flood.

Later Skaters! See you on the Flip Side
 
Posts: 4294 | Registered: October 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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What can I say? I'm a librarian, and it's not like I waste my time going round on message boards decalring that Pratchett is being insulting to librarians because he portrays a librarian as a monkey. smile

- Michael

 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've just bought the new British paperback of "The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents". I'm enjoying it very much! smile It's funny and it's philosophical in a way that's enjoyable both to kids and grown ups.



Amazon.co.uk Review:
"Terry Pratchett returns to children's stories and to his infamous Discworld with Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, a clever spin on the Pied Piper fairytale with a lavish sprinkling of the Practchett magic.

Maurice is a talking cat who leads a band of rather special rats from town to town to fake invasions of vermin. Keith, in cahoots with Maurice, turns up with his flute and leads the rats out of town--a hefty reward in tow. It's a scam that works perfectly... until they arrive in the town of Bad Blintz and their ruse is sussed by the young girl Malicia. Maurice and his mice realise they are about to be caught in the middle of something rather bad.

This is a fresh and funny adventure story that allows Pratchett to make free use of his immense comic talents (the talking rats are easily some of his most hilarious creations). It's also full of cute little ideas: the mice take their names from cans and packets lying in rubbish dumps, so we have heroes called "Big Savings" and "Best Before".

Terry Pratchett has created a wonderful, old-fashioned tale where the subtle morals and lessons never hinder the action. Younger children may initially struggle with Mr Pratchett's unusual style, but once they get to grips with the humour, this will be a laugh-a-minute for both kids and their parents. (Ages 8 and over)" --Jon Weir

- Michael

 
Posts: 13534 | Location: Denmark | Registered: June 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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