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Ray Bradbury
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This guy is a writing god. Beautiful sentences drip from his mind like strands of pure gold, conjuring Ohios and Mars that never existed excepted that they did and he is the only one left to write and elegy for them...
Sorry. Got carried away. Its hard not to do that when writing about the guy. Anyway, I think he's one of the greatest writers ever, though oddly enough I don't read him that much. Recently finished "The Martian Chronicles," and have read a bunch of his short stories. I was required to read "Fahrenheit 451," which was so different from his other stuff, though still good. I am annoyed at his tendency to string similar themed short stories together and call the thing a "novel"-- its what he did with "Dandelion Wine," "Green Shadows, White Whale," and "The Martian Chronicles." Still, I can't fault the guy... he can be so damn good...
 
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I love Bradbury. He has the strangest power to ake me want to move to a small town in Illinois, because of the way he describes such small towns, and for the interesting things that happen there. I read lots and lots of Bradbury every Fall. Started early this year, with Fahrenheit 451. My paperback edition has a Coda, and it is the most wonderful coda ever written. I read it when I get a certain kind of angry. He's just lovely.

Maure.

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Posts: 1602 | Location: Chicago, IL USA | Registered: June 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The fifties where probably his 'golden' period. He kinda lost it a bit in the sixties. You can see it if you read the 800 page "The Stories of Ray Bradbury", where the stories are printed in sequence. The ideas start becoming less strong around 1960, and the language more self-conscious.

My favorite story is still the immortal "Dark they Were and Golden Eyed", which is a Mars story that wasn't collected in "Martian Chronicles"

- Michael
 
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I loved The October Country.

Edited in: My 666th post! Yay!
 
Posts: 5530 | Location: Pittsburgh, PA | Registered: June 28, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I really wasnt't all that impressed by October Country.... it was too disjointed, or something. But his short stories are wonderful.

Funny(ish) story: I started reading Bradbury a few years ago. The first time my dad saw me reading it, he got all weirded out. I've been reading King since I was 12, Barker since I was 15, and Rice since I was 13: Bradbury is not going to warp my little mind. For some reason, my dad thought that those books were something only a certain type of strange person read. Beats me.
 
Posts: 84 | Location: Spring Creek, Nevada, USA | Registered: November 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've been reading Bradbury for a while, and Mom didn't care. Rice raised a few eyebrows, as did King... and I'm just starting reading Barker.
I think Dad's "logic" is that everyone you read except Bradbury is mainstream. The books may be weird, but goddamit, normal people read Stephen King! And his books get made into movies! But what wholesome, god-fearing, real American would read a crazy sci-fi author like Bradbury?
Yes, I know half of what Bradbury rights is fantasy/horror. I was pretending to be your Dad. Hypothetically.
Bradbury disturbs more more then the other three authors because he's just plain weird. King and Rice have vampire stories and werewolf stories. King's got those, and a motly collection of psychics, pyrokenitics, and TK talents. Scary, but all things i've heard of before.
Ray Bradbury wrote a story about a woman giving birth to a small blue cube.
Oddly enough, Mom lets my little sis read Bradbury, but she'd go nuts if i gave her any King or Barker. Probably 'cause Bradbury's a "serious" author-- he has more literary merit. I can't really argue with that....
I haven't read "October Country." I have a bunch of his short stories collections, and i've read a few of his novels. Around here, "Fahrenheit 451" is required reading in 8th grade. Or maybe that's cause one of the English teachers is a big Bradbury fan...
The only stories of his I didn't really like were "A Crack of Thunder," "Rocket Man," and "The Smile." But maybe that's because they got assigned in class.
 
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Ray Bradbury worse than Clive Barker?

Hahaha!

Anyway...

I bought "From the Dust Returned" yesterday. I am looking forward to reading it.

I think I might buy the "Stories of Ray Bradbury" if it has all of his stories (up to the year it was published, of course). Does it?
 
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Originally posted by Grandlethal:

I think I might buy the "Stories of Ray Bradbury" if it has all of his stories (up to the year it was published, of course). Does it?


Nope - it's a "greatest hits" - but its VERY comprehensive. It probably has all the stories that you need to read.. . . No wait - as far as I remember "Dark They Were, and Golden Eyed" isn't in it. Damn!

- Michael

 
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i was required to read Farenheit 451 in school. and that is the book that made me fall in love with reading.
 
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My favourite's Halloween Tree, but I just love his writing style, his themes and his characters.

Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils.
--Hector Berlioz
 
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I loaned my copy of Zen and the Art of Writing a year ago and I probably need to buy a new copy... excellent stuff.

John Paul Allen

<I>"The best time for me was just before the screaming stopped and their voices hit that pitch." - Jeffrey Michael Roberts, Gifted Trust</I>
 
Posts: 136 | Location: Humble,Texas,USA | Registered: October 06, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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God, I ADORE Bradbury. I read Farenheit 451 in 9th grade English, and that was that - I was hooked. If you want to read a great, poetic, magnificent book, read Something Wicked This Way Comes. Breathtaking.

Someone said before that Dandelion Wine is not a novel, but a collection of similar short stories. I don't think that's so. I mean, if you read the whole thing, you can see that the main character is learning lessons all throughout his summer. It starts with him realizing he is alive, moves into his realization that he will die, and then it ends by suggesting that yes, you are alive, and you will die, but what counts is the little things that are happening right now. And the short chapters in that book are just illustrating that point in part. At least, that's what I think.
 
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I'd argue that it's just fiction, and trying to pin it down to anything narrower than that is like trying to nail baby poop to a barn door.

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Just finished listening to From The Dust Returned, and was wondering something... Are the October People mentioned in many of his books, and if so is it a specific people or just a turn of phrase he enjoys. I just seem to recall the phrase being used in Something Wicked This Way Comes (when the dad is talking to the boys in the library) (though I could be wrong)
 
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Yes, the October People show up in "Something Wicked," and Uncle Einar and company show up in a lot of his short stories, though most are either uncollected or in strange anthologies from obscure presses. "From Dust Returned" is the first conscious effort, it seems, to gather as many October People stories into one place as possible.

"You think there are the good people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and only, the bad people. But some of them are on different sides."
- Lord Vetinari
 
Posts: 48716 | Location: Concord, NH, USA | Registered: July 20, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yay!

Bradbury.

I read Fahrenheit 451 as my first Bradbury book, like most people, then moved on to Something Wicked This Way Comes at the behest of my elder brother. I finished From the Dust Returns a few weeks ago and just bought Dandelion Wine - I'm on page 106, and thirsting for dandelion wine...the taste of summer...

My sister has his Zen and the Art of Writing, which I mean to read after Puddinhead Wilson by Mark Twain (I have a stack of books five feet high to read after my most recent raid of Barnes and Noble - the list just seems to grow and grow!).

I read the Naming of Names (Martian Chronicles) in my English Lit. Book - *big grin*.

I think what I love most to tell people about Bradbury is his eratic style - like in Something Wicked This Way Comes he wrote a chapter that was one sentence long. No matter how many times I read that book, I crack up whenever I get to that chapter. I mean...it's hilarious. Just the audacity and downright arrogance of it... And then in From the Dust Returned he writes an entire chapter about the wind in the chimneys, which is amazing.

Personally, I think Anne Rice and Ray Bradbury are very similar in their styles and approach to writing.

I have some Barker stuff in my pile to read (Coldheart Canyon and the Damnation Game - either of those any good?), but Stephen King never seems to have any point to his books. His best stuff, to me, is 'Salem's Lot and The Dark Tower series.
And Cujo was so not scary at all. Just incredibly depressing. I dunno....

Anywho. Just had to add in my two cents when I saw a Bradbury thread. Done now. Wink


-XENO

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Originally posted by the_lady_Door:
I really wasnt't all that impressed by October Country.... it was too disjointed, or something. But his short stories are wonderful.



October Country is a collection of short stories. Personally, I think it's one of the best collections of his short stories. The above confuses me. If you were reading OC as a novel, then of course it would be disjointed. But you say his short stories are wonderful, and that's what the book is full of, so what about it was disjointed to you?

Maure.

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Originally posted by Xenocide Isis:
Personally, I think Anne Rice and Ray Bradbury are very similar in their styles and approach to writing.



Er, how so? I don't see the connection. heck, it sounds something like "I think Rob Liefield and Jack Kirby are very similar in their styles and approach to art."

Let me put it this way: when Bradbury wrote about vampires, he wrote about a quirky little family of them. When Anne Rice wrote about vampires, she wrote erotic fiction with neat fights and historical overtones.

I dunno... i don't see the connection, but if you point it out for me maybe i will...

See you, space cowboy.

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"Shared pain is lessened, shared joy is increased, and thus do we refute entropy."-- Spider Robinson

http://lon.blogspot.com -- Its a slightly less eloquent me.

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Posts: 16135 | Location: Sydney, Australia | Registered: June 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anne Rice and Ray Bradbury couldn't be farther apart in terms of style, vocabulary and the nature of their writing.

Style-wise, Rice owes a heavy debt to the Victorians and their flowery prose. Bradbury is a neorealist, far more Dada than Diderot.

Rice uses some archaic language, but other than that her vocabulary is strictly dictionary stuff. Bradbury takes great pleasure in constructing ee cummins adjectives, jamming together nouns and adjectives and forcing them to dance, dance, dance to his maddening tune.

Rice has stated, categorically, that she knows exactly what's going to happen in her stories. She maps them out on flow charts, writes notes and has the chart next to her while writing to keep her on task. Bradbury has stated, just as categorically, that he sits down to the typewriter with maybe a phrase or a vague idea of a direction, and just goes. He'll type for five or six hours, generating dozens of pages, and then pare them down to a 2000-word short story or expand it into a novel. Not even he knows just what's going to happen.

I'm sorry, Xenocide, but if I were grading that thesis, my hand would already be starting to write the "D" before you even start in on proving your point. I'm prepared to be persuaded.

"You think there are the good people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and only, the bad people. But some of them are on different sides."
- Lord Vetinari
 
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Thank you, DiD, for making my point without resorting to the snobbishness and Anne Rice-bashing I would have used. I was trying to think of a way to do what you did.

But yes, I don't see the simliarities. I can usually connect any two things, but the difference between the two is so extreme... Anne Rice's stories are also much more liner then most of Bradbury's.
Oh, screw this. I want to go and read some Bradbury. The man is a master.

See you, space cowboy.

~~~~~~~~~

"Shared pain is lessened, shared joy is increased, and thus do we refute entropy."-- Spider Robinson

http://lon.blogspot.com -- Its a slightly less eloquent me.

Until Joel Schumacher directs Spider-Man 3, Make Mine Marvel!
 
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